Summit Resolutions

Outcome Documents of Summit

XV BRICS Summit Johannesburg Declaration

XV BRICS Summit
Johannesburg II Declaration
BRICS and Africa: Partnership for Mutually Accelerated Growth,
Sustainable Development and Inclusive Multilateralism
Sandton, Gauteng, South Africa
Wednesday 23 August 2023

Preamble

1.         We, the Leaders of the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Russian Federation, the Republic of India, the People's Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa met in Sandton, South Africa, from 22 to 24 August 2023 for the XV BRICS Summit held under the theme: "BRICS and Africa: Partnership for Mutually Accelerated Growth, Sustainable Development and Inclusive Multilateralism".

2.         We reaffirm our commitment to the BRICS spirit of mutual respect and understanding, sovereign equality, solidarity, democracy, openness, inclusiveness, strengthened collaboration and consensus. As we build upon 15 years of BRICS Summits, we further commit ourselves to strengthening the framework of mutually beneficial BRICS cooperation under the three pillars of political and security, economic and financial, and cultural and people-to-people cooperation and to enhancing our strategic partnership for the benefit of our people through the promotion of peace, a more representative, fairer international order, a reinvigorated and reformed multilateral system, sustainable development and inclusive growth.

Partnership for Inclusive Multilateralism

3.         We reiterate our commitment to inclusive multilateralism and upholding international law, including the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations (UN) as its indispensable cornerstone, and the central role of the UN in an international system in which sovereign states cooperate to maintain peace and security, advance sustainable development, ensure the promotion and protection of democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, and promoting cooperation based on the spirit of solidarity, mutual respect, justice and equality.

4.         We express concern about the use of unilateral coercive measures, which are incompatible with the principles of the Charter of the UN and produce negative effects notably in the developing world. We reiterate our commitment to enhancing and improving global governance by promoting a more agile, effective, efficient, representative, democratic and accountable international and multilateral system.

5.         We call for greater representation of emerging markets and developing countries, in international organizations and multilateral fora in which they play an important role. We also call for increasing the role and share of women from EMDCs at different levels of responsibilities in the international organizations.

6.         We reiterate the need for all countries to cooperate in promoting and protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms under the principles of equality and mutual respect. We agree to continue to treat all human rights including the right to development in a fair and equal manner, on the same footing and with the same emphasis. We agree to strengthen cooperation on issues of common interests both within BRICS and in multilateral fora including the United Nations General Assembly and Human Rights Council, taking into account the necessity to promote, protect and fulfil human rights in a non-selective, non-politicised and constructive manner and without double standards. We call for the respect of democracy and human rights. In this regard, we underline that they should be implemented on the level of global governance as well as at national level. We reaffirm our commitment to ensuring the promotion and protection of democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all with the aim to build a brighter shared future for the international community based on mutually beneficial cooperation.

7.         We support a comprehensive reform of the UN, including its Security Council, with a view to making it more democratic, representative, effective and efficient, and to increase the representation of developing countries in the Council’s memberships so that it can adequately respond to prevailing global challenges and support the legitimate aspirations of emerging and developing countries from Africa, Asia and Latin America, including Brazil, India and South Africa, to play a greater role in international affairs, in particular in the United Nations, including its Security Council.

8.         We reaffirm our support for the open, transparent, fair, predictable, inclusive, equitable, non-discriminatory and rules-based multilateral trading system with the World Trade Organisation (WTO) at its core, with special and differential treatment (S&DT) for developing countries, including Least Developed Countries. We stress our support to work towards positive and meaningful outcomes on the issues at the 13th Ministerial Conference (MC13). We commit to engage constructively to pursue the necessary WTO reform with a view to presenting concrete deliverables to MC13. We call for the restoration of a fully and well-functioning two-tier binding WTO dispute settlement system accessible to all members by 2024, and the selection of new Appellate Body Members without further delay.

9.         We call for the need to make progress towards the achievement of a fair and market-oriented agricultural trading system, ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition, promoting sustainable agriculture and food systems, and implement resilient agricultural practices. We emphasize the need to deliver on agriculture reform in accordance with the mandate in Article 20 of the Agreement on Agriculture, while recognizing the importance of respecting the mandates with regards to a Permanent Solution on Public Stockholding (PSH) for food security purposes and special safeguard mechanism (SSM) for developing countries, including LDCs, in their respective negotiating contexts. BRICS members are also concerned with trade restrictive measures which are inconsistent with WTO rules, including unilateral illegal measures such as sanctions, that affect agricultural trade.

10.      We support a robust Global Financial Safety Net with a quota-based and adequately resourced International Monetary Fund (IMF) at its centre. We call for the conclusion of the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) 16th General Review of Quotas before 15 December 2023. The review should restore the primary role of quotas in the IMF. Any adjustment in quota shares should result in increases in the quota shares of emerging markets and developing economies (EMDCs), while protecting the voice and representation of the poorest members. We call for reform of the Bretton Woods institutions, including for a greater role for emerging markets and developing countries, including in leadership positions in the Bretton Woods institutions, that reflect the role of EMDCs in the world economy.

Fostering an Environment of Peace and Development

11.      We welcome the Joint Statement of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs and International Relations meeting on 1 June 2023 and note the 13th Meeting of BRICS National Security Advisors and High Representatives on National Security held on 25 July 2023.

12.      We are concerned about ongoing conflicts in many parts of the world. We stress our commitment to the peaceful resolution of differences and disputes through dialogue and inclusive consultations in a coordinated and cooperative manner and support all efforts conducive to the peaceful settlement of crises.

13.      We recognise the importance of the increased participation of women in peace processes including in conflict prevention and resolution, peacekeeping, peacebuilding, post-conflict reconstruction and development, and sustaining peace.

14.      We stress our commitment to multilateralism and to the central role of the United Nations which are prerequisites to maintain peace and security. We call on the international community to support countries in working together towards post- pandemic economic recovery. We emphasise the importance of contributing to post- conflict countries’ reconstruction and development and call upon the international community to assist countries in meeting their development goals. We stress the imperative of refraining from any coercive measures not based on international law and the UN Charter.

15.      We reiterate the need for full respect of international humanitarian law in conflict situations and the provision of humanitarian aid in accordance with the basic principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence established in UNGA resolution 46/182.

16.      We commend continued collective efforts of the United Nations, the African Union and sub-regional organisations, including in particular the cooperation between the United Nations Security Council and the African Union Peace and Security Council, to address regional challenges including maintaining peace and security, promoting peacebuilding, post-conflict reconstruction and development, and call for continued support by the international community to these endeavours using diplomatic means such as dialogue, negotiations, consultations, mediation, and good offices, to resolve international disputes and conflicts, settle them on the basis of mutual respect, compromise, and the balance of legitimate interests. We reiterate that the principle “African solutions to African problems” should continue to serve as the basis for conflict resolution. In this regard we support African peace efforts on the continent by strengthening the relevant capacities of African States. We are concerned about the worsening violence in Sudan. We urge the immediate cessation of hostilities and call for the unimpeded access of the Sudanese population to humanitarian assistance. We remain concerned at the situation in the Sahel region, in particular in the Republic of Niger. We support the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Libya. We reiterate our support for a “Libyan led and Libyan-owned” political process with UN-led mediation as the main channel. We emphasize the need to achieve an enduring and mutually acceptable political solution to the question of Western Sahara in accordance with relevant UNSC resolutions and in fulfilment of the mandate of the United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO).

17.      We welcome the positive developments in the Middle East and the efforts by BRICS countries to support development, security and stability in the region. In this regard, we endorse the Joint Statement by the BRICS Deputy Foreign Ministers and Special Envoys for the Middle East and North Africa at their meeting of 26 April 2023. We welcome the reestablishment of diplomatic relations between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran and emphasise that deescalating tensions and managing differences through dialogue and diplomacy is key to peaceful coexistence in this strategically important region of the world. We reaffirm our support for Yemen’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity, and commend the positive role of all the parties involved in bringing about a ceasefire and seeking a political solution to end the conflict. We call on all parties to engage in inclusive direct negotiations and to support the provision of humanitarian, relief and development assistance to the Yemeni people. We support all efforts conducive to a political and negotiated solution that respects Syrian sovereignty and territorial integrity and the promotion of a lasting settlement to the Syrian crisis. We welcome the readmission of the Syrian Arab Republic to the League of Arab States. We express our deep concern at the dire humanitarian situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories due to escalating violence under continued Israeli occupation and the expansion of illegal settlements. We call on the international community to support direct negotiations based on international law including relevant UN Security Council and General Assembly resolutions and the Arab Peace Initiative, towards a two-state solution, leading to the establishment of a sovereign, independent and viable State of Palestine. We commend the extensive work carried out by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) and call for greater international support for UNRWA activities to alleviate the humanitarian situation of the Palestinian people.

18.      We express serious concern with the ongoing deterioration of the security, humanitarian, political and economic situation in Haiti. We believe that the current crisis requires a Haitian-led solution that encompasses national dialogue and consensus building among local political forces, institutions and the society. We call on the international community to support the Haitian endeavours to dismantle the gangs, enhance the security situation and put in place the foundations for long-lasting social and economic development in the country.

19.      We recall our national positions concerning the conflict in and around Ukraine as expressed at the appropriate fora, including the UNSC and UNGA. We note with appreciation relevant proposals of mediation and good offices aimed at peaceful resolution of the conflict through dialogue and diplomacy, including the African Leaders Peace Mission and the proposed path for peace.

20.      We call for the strengthening of disarmament and non-proliferation, including the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) and the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (CWC), recognizing its role in safeguarding and for preserving their integrity and effectiveness to maintain global stability and international peace and security. We underline the need to comply with and strengthen the BTWC, including by adopting a legally binding Protocol to the Convention that provides for, inter alia, an efficient verification mechanism. We reassert our support for ensuring the long-term sustainability of outer space activities and prevention of an arms race in outer space (PAROS) and of its weaponization, including through negotiations to adopt a relevant legally binding multilateral instrument. We recognise the value of the updated Draft Treaty on the Prevention of the Placement of Weapons in Outer Space, the Threat or Use of Force against Outer Space Objects (PPWT) submitted to the Conference on Disarmament in 2014. We stress that practical and non-binding commitments, such as Transparency and Confidence-Building Measures (TCBMs), may also contribute to PAROS.

21.      We reiterate the need to resolve the Iranian nuclear issue through peaceful and diplomatic means in accordance with the international law, and stress the importance of preserving the JCPOA and the UNSCR 2231 to international non-proliferation as well as wider peace and stability and hope for relevant parties to restore the full and effective implementation of the JCPOA at an early date.

22.      We express strong condemnation of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed. We recognize the threat emanating from terrorism, extremism conducive to terrorism and radicalization. We are committed to combating terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, including the cross-border movement of terrorists, and terrorism financing networks and safe havens. We reiterate that terrorism should not be associated with any religion, nationality, civilization or ethnic group. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to contribute further to the global efforts of preventing and countering the threat of terrorism on the basis of respect for international law, in particular the Charter of the United Nations, and human rights, emphasizing that States have the primary responsibility in combating terrorism with the United Nations continuing to play central and coordinating role in this area. We also stress the need for a comprehensive and balanced approach of the whole international community to effectively curb the terrorist activities, which pose a serious threat, including in the present-day pandemic environment. We reject double standards in countering terrorism and extremism conducive to terrorism. We call for an expeditious finalization and adoption of the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism within the UN framework and for launching multilateral negotiations on an international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and biological terrorism, at the Conference of Disarmament. We welcome the activities of the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group and its five Subgroups based upon the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Strategy and the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Action Plan. We look forward to further deepening counter-terrorism cooperation.


23.      While emphasising the formidable potential of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for growth and development, we recognise the existing and emerging possibilities they bring for criminal activities and threats, and express concern over the increasing level and complexity of criminal misuse of ICTs. We welcome the ongoing efforts in the Ad Hoc Committee to elaborate a comprehensive international convention on countering the use of ICTs for criminal purposes and reaffirm our commitment to cooperating in the implementation of the mandate adopted by the UN General Assembly resolution 75/282 in a timely manner.

24.      We reaffirm our commitment to the promotion of an open, secure, stable, accessible and peaceful ICT-environment, underscored the importance of enhancing common understandings and intensifying cooperation in the use of ICTs and Internet. We support the leading role of the United Nations in promoting constructive dialogue on ensuring ICT-security, including within the UN Open-Ended Working Group on security of and in the use of ICTs 2021-2025, and developing a universal legal framework in this realm. We call for a comprehensive, balanced, objective approach to the development and security of ICT products and systems. We underscore the importance of establishing legal frameworks of cooperation among BRICS countries on ensuring security in the use of ICTs. We also acknowledge the need to advance practical intra-BRICS cooperation through implementation of the BRICS Roadmap of Practical Cooperation on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and the activities of the BRICS Working Group on security in the use of ICTs.

25.      We reaffirm our commitment to strengthen international cooperation and our collaboration against corruption and continue to implement the relevant international agreements in this regard, in particular the United Nations Convention against Corruption. With the knowledge that the scourge of corruption knows no geographic boundaries, and respects no society or humanitarian cause, we have jointly put in place a strong foundation to combat corruption through capacity building, including, conducting training programmes and sharing of current best practices applied in each of our countries. We will continue to reinforce these efforts and increase our knowledge of the emerging avenues. We will enhance international cooperation through collaborative information-sharing networks, and mutual legal assistance to combat illicit financial flows, counter safe havens and support the investigation, prosecution and recovery of stolen assets subject to domestic laws and regulations of BRICS countries.

Partnership for Mutually Accelerated Growth

26.      We note that an unbalanced recovery from the shock and hardship of the pandemic is aggravating inequality across the world. The global growth momentum has weakened, and the economic prospects have declined owing to trade fragmentation, prolonged high inflation, tighter global financial conditions, in particular the increase in interest rates in advanced economies, geopolitical tensions and increased debt vulnerabilities.

27.      We encourage multilateral financial institutions and international organizations to play a constructive role in building global consensus on economic policies and preventing systemic risks of economic disruption and financial fragmentation. We call for Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) to continue implementing the recommendations which should be voluntary within MDBs governance frameworks, from the G20 Independent Review Report on MDBs Capital Adequacy Frameworks to increase their lending capacities, while safeguarding MDBs long-term financial stability, robust creditor rating, and preferred creditor status.

28.      We believe that multilateral cooperation is essential to limit the risks stemming from geopolitical and geoeconomic fragmentation and intensify efforts on areas of mutual interest, including but not limited to, trade, poverty and hunger reduction, sustainable development, including access to energy, water and food, fuel, fertilizers, as well as mitigating and adapting to the impact of climate change, education, health as well as pandemic prevention, preparedness and response.

29.      We note that high debt levels in some countries reduce the fiscal space needed to address ongoing development challenges aggravated by spillover effects from external shocks, particularly from sharp monetary tightening in advanced economies. Rising interest rates and tighter financing conditions worsen debt vulnerabilities in many countries. We believe it is necessary to address the international debt agenda properly to support economic recovery and sustainable development, while taking into account each nation’s laws and internal procedures. One of the instruments, amongst others, to collectively address debt vulnerabilities is through the predictable, orderly, timely and coordinated implementation of the G20 Common Framework for Debt Treatment, with the participation of official bilateral creditors, private creditors and Multilateral Development Banks in line with the principle of joint action and fair burden-sharing.

30.      We reaffirm the importance of the G20 to continue playing the role of the premier multilateral forum in the field of international economic and financial cooperation that comprises both developed and emerging markets and developing countries where major economies jointly seek solutions to global challenges. We look forward to the successful hosting of the 18th G20 Summit in New Delhi under the Indian G20 Presidency. We note the opportunities to build sustained momentum for change by India, Brazil and South Africa presiding over the G20 from 2023 to 2025 and expressed support for continuity and collaboration in their G20 presidencies and wish them all success in their endeavours. Therefore, we are committed to a balanced approach by continuing to amplify and further integrate the voice of the global South in the G20 agenda as under the Indian Presidency in 2023 and the Brazilian and South African presidencies in 2024 and 2025.

31.      We recognize the important role of BRICS countries working together to deal with risks and challenges to the world economy in achieving global recovery and sustainable development. We reaffirm our commitment to enhance macro-economic policy coordination, deepen economic cooperation, and work to realize strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive economic recovery. We emphasize the importance of continued implementation of the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2025 in all relevant ministerial tracks and working groups. We will look to identify solutions for accelerating the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

32.      Recognising that BRICS countries produce one third of the world's food, we reaffirm our commitment to strengthen agricultural cooperation and promote sustainable agriculture and rural development of BRICS countries for enhancing food security both within BRICS and worldwide. We emphasize the strategic importance of facilitating steady access to agricultural inputs, on ensuring global food security. We reiterate the importance of implementing the Action Plan 2021-2024 for Agricultural Cooperation of BRICS Countries, and welcome the Strategy on Food Security Cooperation of the BRICS Countries. We underscore the need for resilient food supply chains.

33.      We recognize the dynamism of the digital economy in enabling global economic growth. We also recognize the positive role that trade and investment can play in promoting sustainable development, national and regional industrialization, the transition towards sustainable consumption and production patterns. We recognize the challenges facing trade and investment development in the digital era and acknowledge that BRICS members are at different levels of digital development, and thus recognize the need to address respective challenges including the various digital divides. We welcome the establishment of the BRICS Digital Economy Working Group. We reaffirm that openness, efficiency, stability, reliability, are crucial in tackling economic recovery challenges and boosting international trade and investment. We encourage further cooperation among BRICS countries to enhance the interconnectivity of supply chains and payment systems to promote trade and investment flows. We agree to strengthen exchanges and cooperation in trade in services as established in the BRICS Framework for Cooperation on Trade in Services, with the BRICS Business Council and BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (WBA) with the aim to promote implementation of BRICS Trade in Services Cooperation Roadmap and relevant documents including the BRICS Framework for cooperation in Trade in Professional Services.

34.      We reiterate our support to the African Union Agenda 2063 and to Africa's efforts towards integration, including through the operationalisation of the African Continental Free Trade Area. We underscore that the AfCFTA is poised to create a predictable environment for investments, particularly in infrastructure development, and provides an opportunity to find synergies with partners on cooperation, trade and development on the African continent. We underline the importance of strengthening the partnership between BRICS and Africa to unlock mutually beneficial opportunities for increased trade, investment and infrastructure development. We welcome progress made towards the AfCFTA Protocol on Women and Youth in Trade and recognise its potential to be a catalyst for economic and financial inclusion of women and youth into Africa’s economy. We stress the importance of issues including industrialization, infrastructure development, food security, agriculture modernisation for sustainable growth health-care, and tackling climate change for the sustainable development of Africa.

35.      We further note that the African continent remains on the margins of the global trading system and has much to gain through BRICS collaboration. The African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) and BRICS cooperation presents opportunities for the continent to transition away from its historic role as a commodity exporter towards higher productivity value addition. We welcome and support the inclusion of the African Union as a member of the G20 at the New Delhi G20 Summit.

36.      We commit to strengthening intra-BRICS cooperation to intensify the BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR) and create new opportunities for accelerating industrial development. We support intra-BRICS cooperation in human resource development on new technologies through the BRICS Centre for Industrial Competences (BCIC), BRICS PartNIR Innovation Centre, BRICS Startup Forum and collaboration with other relevant BRICS mechanisms, to carry out training programmes to address challenges of NIR for Inclusive and sustainable industrialization. We reiterate our commitment to continue discussion on the establishment of BCIC in cooperation with UNIDO to jointly support the development of Industry 4.0 skills development among the BRICS countries and to promote partnerships and increased productivity in the New Industrial Revolution. We look forward to the cooperation with UNIDO and request the PartNIR Advisory Group to coordinate with UNIDO.

37.      We recognize the crucial role that Micro, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSMEs) play in unlocking the full potential of BRICS economies and reaffirm the importance of their participation in production networks and value chains. We will continue joint efforts aimed at eliminating constraints such as lack of easily accessible information and financing, skills shortage, network effects, as well as regulation of excessive administrative burden, and procurement related constraints ensuring easily accessible information and financing, skill up gradation and market linkage. We endorse the BRICS MSMEs Cooperation Framework which promotes BRICS cooperation on such issues as exchanging information about fairs and exhibitions, and encouraging participation of MSMEs in the selected events to enhance interactions and cooperation amongst MSMEs which may secure deals. Member states will facilitate exchange of business missions, and promote sector specific Business to Business (B2B) meetings amongst the MSMEs, to enhance enterprise-to-enterprise cooperation and business alliances between the MSMEs of BRICS, with a particular focus on women-owned and youth-owned MSMEs. Member States will provide information relating to MSMEs, business development opportunities and possibilities of partnerships for the development of MSMEs in the BRICS countries. In addition, we will promote sharing of information on trade policies, and market intelligence for MSMEs to increase their participation in international trade. We will facilitate access to resources and capabilities such as skills, knowledge networks, and technology that could help MSMEs improve their participation in the economy and global value chains. We will exchange views on measures and approaches for integrating BRICS MSMEs into global trade and Global Value Chains, including by sharing experience on how regional integration approaches can support the development of MSMEs.

38.      We reiterate the commitment to promote employment for sustainable development, including to develop skills to ensure resilient recovery, gender- responsive employment and social protection policies including workers' rights. We reaffirm our commitment to respect, promote, and realise decent work for all and achieve social justice. We will step up efforts to effectively abolish child labour based on the Durban Call to Action and accelerate progress towards universal social protection for all by 2030. We will invest in skills development systems to improve access to relevant and quality skills for workers in the informal economy and workers in new forms of employment as we seek to increase productivity for economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable and inclusive economies. We will explore the development of a BRICS platform to implement the Productivity Ecosystem for Decent Work.

39.      We acknowledge the urgent need for tourism industry recovery and the importance of increasing mutual tourist flows and will work towards further strengthening the BRICS Alliance for Green Tourism to promote measures, which can shape a more resilient, sustainable and inclusive tourism sector.

40.      We agree to enhance exchanges and cooperation in the field of standardization and make full use of standards to advance sustainable development.

41.      We agree to continue to deepen cooperation on competition amongst BRICS countries and create a fair competition market environment for international economic and trade cooperation.

42.      We agree to enhance dialogue and cooperation on intellectual property rights through, the BRICS IPR cooperation mechanism (IPRCM). As we celebrate a decade of cooperation of the Heads of Intellectual Property Offices, we welcome the alignment of their workplan to the Sustainable Development Goals.

43.      We support enhancing statistical cooperation within BRICS as data, statistics and information form the basis of informed and effective decision making. On the 10th anniversary of its first issue, we support the continued release of the BRICS Joint Statistical Publication 2023 and the BRICS Joint Statistical Publication Snapshot 2023 for engaging a wider range of users.

44.      We recognise the widespread benefits of fast, inexpensive, transparent, safe, and inclusive payment systems. We look forward to the report by the BRICS Payment Task Force (BPTF) on the mapping of the various elements of the G20 Roadmap on Cross- border Payments in BRICS countries. We welcome the sharing of experience by BRICS members on payment infrastructures, including the interlinking of cross-border payment systems. We believe this will further enhance cooperation amongst the BRICS countries and encourage further dialogue on payment instruments to facilitate trade and investment flows between the BRICS members as well as other developing countries. We stress the importance of encouraging the use of local currencies in international trade and financial transactions between BRICS as well as their trading partners. We also encourage strengthening of correspondent banking networks between the BRICS countries and enabling settlements in the local currencies.

45.      We task our Finance Ministers and/or Central Bank Governors, as appropriate, to consider the issue of local currencies, payment instruments and platforms and report back to us by the next Summit.

46.      We recognise the key role of the NDB in promoting infrastructure and sustainable development of its member countries. We congratulate Ms Dilma Rousseff, former President of the Federative Republic of Brazil, as President of the New Development Bank (NDB) and are confident that she will contribute to strengthening of the NDB in effectively achieving its mandate. We expect the NDB to provide and maintain the most effective financing solutions for sustainable development, a steady process in membership expansion, and improvements in corporate governance and operational effectiveness towards the fulfilment of NDB's General Strategy for 2022-2026. We welcome the three new members of the NDB, namely Bangladesh, Egypt and United Arab Emirates. We encourage the NDB to play an active role in knowledge sharing process and incorporate the member-countries best practices in its operational policies, according to its governance mechanism and taking into account national priorities and development goals. We see the NDB as an important member of global MDB family, given its unique status as an institution created by EMDCs for EMDCs.


47.      We welcome the establishment of the BRICS Think Tank Network for Finance during 2022 and efforts to operationalise the Network. We will work towards the identification and designation of the lead Think Tanks from member countries. We endorse the Operational Guidelines for the BRICS Think Tank Network for Finance developed under South Africa’s Chairship, which provides guidance on how the Network will operate in terms of governance, delivery of outputs and funding of the BRICS Think Tank Network for Finance.

48.      We recognise that infrastructure investments support human, social, environmental, and economic development. We note that the demand for infrastructure is growing, with a greater need for scale, innovation and sustainability. We highlight that BRICS countries continue to offer excellent opportunities for infrastructure investment. In this regard, we further recognise that leveraging governments’ limited resources to catalyse private capital, expertise and efficiency will be paramount in closing the infrastructure investment gap in BRICS countries.

49.      We continue to support the work of the Task Force on Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and Infrastructure in sharing knowledge, good practices and lessons learnt on the effective development and delivery of infrastructure for the benefit of all member countries. In this regard, the Task Force has collated guiding principles that advance the adoption of a programmatic approach in infrastructure delivery and promotes the use of PPPs and other blended finance solutions in infrastructure development and delivery. We look forward to convening the Infrastructure Investment Symposium later this year for a discussion amongst BRICS governments, investors and financiers on ways to work with the private sector to promote the use of green, transition and sustainable finance in infrastructure delivery.

50.      The BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) continues to be an important mechanism for mitigating the effects of a crisis situation, complementing existing international financial and monetary arrangements, and contributing to the strengthening of the global financial safety net. We reiterate our commitment to the continued strengthening of the CRA and look forward to the successful completion of the sixth Test-Run later in 2023. We also support progress made to amend the outstanding technical issues on the Inter-Central Bank Agreement and endorse the proposed theme of 2023 BRICS Economic Bulletin ‘Challenges in a post-COVID-19 environment.


51.      We welcome the continued cooperation on topics of mutual interest on sustainable and transition finance, information security, financial technology, and payments, and look forward to building on work in these areas under the relevant work streams, including the proposed study on leveraging technology to address climate data gaps in the financial sector and support the proposed initiatives aimed at enhancing cyber security and developing financial technology, including the sharing of knowledge and experience in this area.

Partnership for Sustainable Development

52.      We reaffirm the call for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in its three dimensions: economic, social and environmental, in a balanced and integrated manner by mobilising the means required to implement the 2030 Agenda. We urge donor countries to honour their Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments and to facilitate capacity building and the transfer of technology along with additional development resources to developing countries, in line with the national policy objectives of recipients. We highlight in this regard that the SDGs Summit to be held in New York in September 2023 and the Summit of the Future to be held in September 2024, constitute significant opportunities for renewing international commitment on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

53.      We recognise the importance of implementing the SDGs in an integrated and holistic manner, inter alia through poverty eradication as well as combating climate change whilst promoting sustainable land use and water management, conservation of biological diversity, and the sustainable use of its components and the biodiversity and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources, including by appropriate access to genetic resources, in line with Article 1 of Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and in accordance with national circumstances, priorities and capabilities. We also underscore the significance of technology and innovation, international cooperation, public-private partnerships, including South-South cooperation.

54.      We underscore the importance of collaborating on biodiversity conservation and sustainable use matters, such as research and development of conservation technologies, development of protected areas, and the combatting of illegal trade in wildlife. Furthermore, we will continue to actively participate in international biodiversity-related conventions, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), its protocols and advancing the implementation of its Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF), Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and working towards the Global Initiative on Reducing Land Degradation and Enhancing Conservation of Terrestrial Habitats.

55.      We welcome the historic adoption of the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework (KMGBF) at the 15th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP-15) in December 2022. We thus undertake to strive towards the implementation of all the global goals and targets of the KMGBF, in accordance with the principles of common but differentiated responsibilities and national circumstances, priorities and capabilities in order to achieve its mission to halt and reverse biodiversity loss and vision of living in harmony with nature. We urge developed countries to provide adequate means of implementation, including financial resources, capacity-building, technical and scientific cooperation, and access to and transfer of technology to fully implement the KMGBF. We also acknowledge the potential for cooperation on the sustainable use of biodiversity in business to support local economic development, industrialisation, job creation, and sustainable business opportunities.

56.      We reemphasise the importance of implementing the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Paris Agreement and the principle of Common but Differentiated Responsibilities and Respective Capabilities (CBDR-RC) enhancing low-cost climate technology transfer, capacity building as well as mobilizing affordable, adequate and timely delivered new additional financial resources for environmentally sustainable projects. We agree that there is a need to defend, promote and strengthen the multilateral response to Climate Change and to work together for a successful outcome of the 28th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC COP28). We recognise that the Means of Implementation should be enhanced by developed countries, including through adequate and timely flow of affordable Climate Finance, Technical Cooperation, Capacity Building and transfer of Technology for climate actions. Furthermore, there is a need for comprehensive financial arrangements to address loss and damage due to climate change, including operationalising Fund on Loss and Damage as agreed at the UNFCCC COP27 to benefit developing countries.


57.      We agree to address the challenges posed by climate change while also ensuring a just, affordable and sustainable transition to a low carbon and low-emission economy in line with the principles of CBDR-RC, in light of different national circumstances. We advocate for just equitable and sustainable transitions, based on nationally defined development priorities, and we call on developed countries to lead by example and support developing countries towards such transitions.

58.      We stress the need for support of developed countries to developing countries for access to existing and emerging low-emission technologies and solutions that avoid, abate and remove GHG emissions and enhance adaptation action to address climate change. We further emphasize the need for enhancing low-cost technology transfer and for mobilizing affordable, adequate new and timely delivered additional financial resources for environmentally sustainable projects.

59.      We express our strong determination to contribute to a successful COP28 in Dubai, later this year, with the focus on implementation and cooperation. As the main mechanism for assessing collective progress towards achieving the purpose of the Paris Agreement and its long-term goals and promoting climate action on all aspects of the Paris Agreement under the UNFCCC, the Global Stocktake must be effective and identifying implementation gaps on the global response to climate change, whilst prospectively laying the foundations for enhanced ambition by all, in particular by developed countries. We call upon developed countries to fill outstanding gaps in means of implementation for mitigation and adaptation actions in developing countries.

60.      We welcome Brazil’s candidacy to host COP30 as the year 2025 will be key to the very future of the global response to climate change.

61.      We further urge developed countries to honour their commitments, including of mobilizing the USD 100bn per annum by 2020 and through 2025 to support climate action in developing countries. In addition, importance of doubling adaptation finance by 2025 from the base of 2019 is also key in order to implement adaptation actions. Moreover, we look forward to setting up an ambitious New Collective Quantified goal, prior to 2025, as per the needs and priorities of developing countries. This will require enhanced financial support from developed countries that is additional, grant-based and/or concessional, timely delivered, and adequate to take forward adaptation and mitigation   action   in   a   balanced   manner.   This   extends   to   support   for   the implementation of the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

62.      We acknowledge that the financial mechanisms and investments to support the implementation of environment and climate change programmes need to be enhanced, and increased momentum to reform these financial mechanisms, as well as the multilateral development banks and international financial institutions is required. In this regard, we call on the shareholders of these institutions to take decisive action to scale-up climate finance and investments in support towards achieving the SDGs related to climate change and make their institutional arrangements fit for purpose.

63.      We oppose trade barriers including those under the pretext of tackling climate change imposed by certain developed countries and reiterate our commitment to enhancing coordination on these issues. We underline that measures taken to tackle climate change and biodiversity loss must be WTO-consistent and must not constitute a means of arbitrary or unjustifiable discrimination or a disguised restriction on international trade and should not create unnecessary obstacles to international trade. Any such measure must be guided by the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities (CBDR-RC), in the light of different national circumstances. We express our concern at any WTO inconsistent discriminatory measure that will distort international trade, risk new trade barriers and shift burden of addressing climate change and biodiversity loss to BRICS members and developing countries.

64.      We commit to intensify our efforts towards improving our collective capacity for global pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response, and strengthening our ability to fight back any such pandemics in the future collectively. In this regard, we consider it important to continue our support to the BRICS Virtual Vaccine Research and Development Center. We look forward to the holding of the High-Level Meeting on Pandemic Prevention, Preparedness and Response to be to be held on 20th September 2023 at the United Nations General Assembly and we call for an outcome that will mobilise political will and continued leadership on this matter.

65.      We recognize the fundamental role of primary health care as a key foundation for Universal Health Care and health system’s resilience, as well as on prevention and response to health emergencies. We believe that the High-level meeting on Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to be held at the UN General Assembly in September 2023 would be a critical step for mobilizing the highest political support for UHC as the cornerstone to achieving SDG 3 (good health and well-being). We reiterate our support for the international initiatives, with the leadership of WHO, on addressing tuberculosis (TB) and look forward to actively engaging in the United Nations High- Level Meeting on TB in New York in September this year and encourage an assertive political declaration.

66.      Taking into account national legislation and priorities of BRICS countries, we commit to continue cooperation in traditional medicine in line with previous meetings of the BRICS Health Ministers and their outcomes, as well as the BRICS High-Level Forum on the Traditional Medicine.

67.      We note that BRICS countries have significant experience and potential in the field of nuclear medicine and radio pharmaceutics. We welcome the decision to establish a BRICS Working Group on Nuclear Medicine to expand cooperation in this area.

68.      We welcome South Africa hosting BRICS Science Technology and Innovation (STI) Steering Committee meetings throughout 2023 as the main coordination mechanism to manage and ensure the successful hosting of BRICS STI activities. We call on the Steering Committee to undertake a strategic review of the thematic focus areas and organisational framework of the BRICS STI Working Group to ensure better alignment as appropriate with current BRICS policy priorities. We commend South Africa for hosting the 8th BRICS Young Scientist Forum and the concurrent organization of the 6th BRICS Young Innovator Prize. We commend the success of the BRICS STI Framework Programme in continuing to connect scientists through the funding of an impressive portfolio of research projects between BRICS countries. We also appreciate the efforts of the BRICS STI Framework Programme Secretariat in facilitating a discussion to launch in 2024 a Call for Proposals for BRICS STI Flagship Projects. We recognize the progress achieved in the implementation of the BRICS Action Plan for Innovation Cooperation (2021-24). In this regard we encourage further actions to be taken on initiatives such as the BRICS Techtransfer (the BRICS Centers for Technology Transfer) and the iBRICS Network (the dedicated BRICS innovation network). We also welcome more actions to be taken, especially by the BRICS STIEP (Science, Technology and Innovation Entrepreneurship Partnership) Working Group, in the fields of innovation and entrepreneurship, for example, through support for the BRICS Incubation Training and Network, the BRICS Technology Transfer Training Program, and the BRICS Startup Forum.

69.      We congratulate our Space agencies for successfully implementing the BRICS RSSC agreement by exchanging of BRICS Satellite Constellation data samples; holding of the 1st BRICS RSSC Application Forum in November 2022; convening of the 2nd meeting of BRICS Space Cooperation Joint Committee in July 2023 and continue to successfully implement the BRICS Constellation Pilot Projects. We encourage the BRICS Space agencies to continue enhancing the level of cooperation in remote sensing satellite data sharing and applications, so as to provide data support for the economic and social development of the BRICS countries.

70.      While emphasising the fundamental role of access to energy in achieving SDGs and noting the outlined risks to energy security we highlight the need for enhanced cooperation among the BRICS countries as major producers and consumers of energy products and services. We believe that energy security, access and energy transitions are important and need to be balanced. We welcome the strengthening of cooperation and increasing investment in the supply chains for energy transitions and note the need to fully participate in the clean energy global value chain. We further commit to increase the resilience of energy systems including critical energy infrastructure, advancing the use of clean energy options, promoting research and innovation in energy science and technology. We intend to address energy security challenges by incentivising energy investment flows. We share a common view, taking into consideration national priorities and circumstances, on the efficient use of all energy sources, namely: renewable energy, including biofuels, hydropower, fossil fuels, nuclear energy and hydrogen produced on the basis of zero and low emission technologies and processes, which are crucial for a just transition towards more flexible, resilient and sustainable energy systems. We recognise the role of fossil fuels in supporting energy security and energy transition. We call for collaboration amongst the BRICS countries on technological neutrality and further urge for the adoption of common, effective, clear, fair and transparent standards and rules for assessment of emissions, elaboration of compatible taxonomies of sustainable projects as well as accounting of carbon units. We welcome joint research and technical cooperation within the BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform, and commend the holding of the BRICS Youth Energy Summit and other related activities.


71.      We remain committed to strengthening BRICS cooperation on population matters, because the dynamics of population age structure change, and pose challenges as well as opportunities, particularly with regard to women’s rights, youth development, disability rights, employment and the future of work, urbanisation, migration and ageing.

72.      We reiterate the importance of BRICS cooperation in the field of disaster management. We stress the importance of disaster risk reduction measures towards building resilient communities and the exchange of information on best practices, adoption of climate change adaptation initiatives, and integration of indigenous knowledge systems and improving investments in early warning systems and disaster resilient infrastructure. We further stress the need for holistic inclusivity in disaster risk reduction by mainstreaming disaster risk reduction in government and community- based planning. We encourage expanding intra-BRICS cooperation through joint activities for enhancing the capacities of national emergency systems.

73.      We agree with the importance placed by South Africa as BRICS Chair on Transforming Education and Skills Development for the Future. We support the principle of facilitating mutual recognition of academic qualifications amongst BRICS countries to ensure mobility of skilled professionals, academics, and students and recognition of qualifications obtained in each other’s countries subject to compliance of applicable domestic laws. We welcome concrete proposals made during the 10th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Education focusing on critical areas in education and training such as entrepreneurship development, skills for the changing world, out-of- school youth, climate change, labour market intelligence, early childhood development and university global ranking. We appreciate the progress on education and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) cooperation, in particular, the operationalization of the BRICS TVET Cooperation Alliance which focuses on strengthening communication and dialogue and early finalisation of the Charter of the BRICS TVET Cooperation Alliance thereby promoting substantial cooperation in TVET, integrating TVET with industry.

74.      We commit to strengthening skills exchanges and cooperation amongst BRICS countries. We support the digital transformation in education and TVET space, as each BRICS country is domestically committed to ensure education accessibility and equity, and promote the development of quality education. We agree to explore opportunities on BRICS digital education cooperative mechanisms, hold dialogues on  digital education policies, share digital educational resources, build smart education systems, and jointly promote digital transformation of education in BRICS countries and to develop a sustainable education by strengthening the cooperation within BRICS Network University and other institution-to-institution initiatives in this area, including the BRICS University League. We welcome the BRICS Network University International     Governing Board consideration to expand membership of the BRICS Network University to include more universities from the BRICS countries. We underscore the importance of sharing best practices on expanding access to holistic early childhood care and education to provide a better start in life for children within BRICS countries. We welcome the decision to facilitate exchanges within BRICS countries on equipping learners with skills fit for the future through multiple learning pathways.

Deepening People-to-People Exchanges

75.      We reaffirm the importance of BRICS people-to-people exchanges in enhancing mutual understanding, friendship and cooperation. We appreciate the progress made under South Africa's Chairship in 2023, and including in the fields of media, culture, education, sports, arts, youth, civil society and academic exchanges, and acknowledge that people-to-people exchanges play an essential role in enriching our societies and developing our economies.

76.      We recognise that youth is a driving force for accelerating the achievement of sustainable development goals. Leadership by young people is fundamental to accelerating a just transition premised on the principles of intergenerational solidarity, international cooperation, friendship, and societal transformation. A culture of entrepreneurship and innovation must be nurtured for the sustainable development of our youth. We reiterate the importance of the BRICS Youth Summit as a forum for meaningful engagement on youth matters and recognise its value as a coordinating structure for youth engagement in BRICS. We welcome the finalisation of the BRICS Youth Council Framework.

77.      We commend the successful holding of the BRICS Business Forum. On its 10th anniversary, we welcome the BRICS Business Council's self-reflection with a focus on milestones achieved and areas of improvement. We further welcome the intention of the BRICS Business Council to track intra-BRICS trade flows, identify areas where trade performance has not met expectations and recommend solutions.

78.      We acknowledge the critical role of women in economic development and commend the BRICS Women's Business Alliance. We recognise that inclusive entrepreneurship and access to finance for women would facilitate their participation in business ventures, innovation, and the digital economy. We welcome initiatives that will enhance agricultural productivity and access to land, technology, and markets for women farmers.

79.      On its 15th anniversary, we recognise the value of BRICS Academic Forum as a platform for deliberations and discussions by leading BRICS academics on the issues confronting us today. The BRICS Think Tanks Council also celebrates 10 years of enhancing cooperation in research and capacity building among the academic communities of BRICS countries.

80.      Dialogue among political parties of BRICS countries plays a constructive role in building consensus and enhancing cooperation. We note the successful hosting of BRICS Political Parties Dialogue in July 2023 and welcome other BRICS countries to host similar events in the future.

81.      We reaffirm our commitments under all the instruments and Agreements signed and adopted by the Governments of the BRICS States on Cooperation in the Field of Culture and commit to operationalising the Action Plan (2022-2026) as a matter of urgency through the BRICS Working Group on Culture.

82.      We commit to ensure the integration of culture into our national development policies, as a driver and an enabler for the achievement of the goals set out in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. We also reaffirm our commitment to promote culture and the creative economy as a global public good as adopted at the World Conference on Culture and Sustainable Development-MONDIACULT22.

83.      We agree to support the protection, preservation, restoration and promotion of our cultural heritage, including both tangible and intangible heritage. We commit to take strong action to fight against illicit trafficking of our cultural property and encourage dialogue among culture and heritage stakeholders and commit to promote digitization of the culture and creative sectors by finding technologically innovative solutions and pushing for policies that transform ways in which cultural contents are produced, disseminated, and accessed. We reaffirm our commitment to support participation of cultural enterprises, museums and institutions in international exhibitions and festivals, hosted by BRICS countries and extend mutual assistance in the organisation of such events.

84.     We welcome the establishment of a Joint Working Group on Sports to develop a BRICS Sport Cooperation Framework, during South Africa’s Chairship in 2023. We look forward to the successful holding of the BRICS Games in October 2023 in South Africa. We commit to provide the necessary support for BRICS countries to participate in international sport competitions and meetings held in their own country in compliance with relevant rules.

85.      We emphasize that all BRICS countries have rich traditional sport culture and agree to support each other in the promotion of traditional and indigenous sports among BRICS countries and around the world. We encourage our sport organizations to carry out various exchange activities both online and offline.

86.      We commend the progress made by BRICS countries in promoting urban resilience including through the BRICS Urbanisation forum and appreciate the commitment to further strengthen inclusive collaboration between government and societies at all levels, in all BRICS countries in implementing the 2030 Agenda and promoting the localisation of the SDGs.

Institutional Development

87.      We reiterate the importance of further enhancing BRICS solidarity and cooperation based on our mutual interests and key priorities, to further strengthen our strategic partnership.

88.      We note with satisfaction the progress made on BRICS institutional development and stress that BRICS cooperation needs to embrace changes and keep abreast with the times. We shall continue to set clear priorities in our wide-ranging cooperation, on the basis of consensus, and make our strategic partnership more efficient, practical and results oriented. We task our Sherpas to continue discussions on a regular basis on BRICS institutional development, including on consolidation of cooperation.

89.     We welcome the participation, at the invitation of South Africa as BRICS Chair, of other EMDCs as "Friends of BRICS” in BRICS meetings below Summit-level and in the BRICS-Africa Outreach and BRICS Plus Dialogue during the XV BRICS Summit in Johannesburg in 2023.

90.      We appreciate the considerable interest shown by countries of the global South in membership of BRICS. True to the BRICS Spirit and commitment to inclusive multilateralism, BRICS countries reached consensus on the guiding principles, standards, criteria and procedures of the BRICS expansion process.

91.      We have decided to invite the Argentine Republic, the Arab Republic of Egypt, the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, the Islamic Republic of Iran, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to become full members of BRICS from 1 January 2024.

92.      We have also tasked our Foreign Ministers to further develop the BRICS partner country model and a list of prospective partner countries and report by the next Summit.

93.      Brazil, Russia, India and China commend South Africa's BRICS Chairship in 2023 and express their gratitude to the government and people of South Africa for holding the XV BRICS Summit.

94.      Brazil, India, China and South Africa extend their full support to Russia for its BRICS Chairship in 2024 and the holding of the XVI BRICS Summit in the city of Kazan, Russia.

XIV BRICS Summit Beijing Declaration

Beijing, 23 June 2022

Preamble

1. We,the Leaders of the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Russian  Federation, the Republic of India, the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa held the XIV BRICS Summit under the theme “Foster High-quality BRICS Partnership, Usher in a New Era for Global Development” on 23-24 June 2022.

2. We recall that in the past 16 years, upholding the BRICS spirit featuring  mutual respect and understanding, equality, solidarity, openness, inclusiveness, and consensus, BRICS countries have strengthened mutual trust,deepened intra-BRICS mutually beneficial cooperation,and closer  people-to-people exchanges, which has led to a series of significant  outcomes. We reiterate the importance of further enhancing BRICS  solidarity and cooperation based on our common interests and key priorities, to further strengthen our strategic partnership.

3. We are glad to note that despite the COVID-19 pandemic and other challenges, BRICS countries in 2022 have jointly continued enhancing solidarity and  deepening cooperation on, inter alia, economy, peace and security, people-to-people exchanges, public health, and sustainable development  by holding a series of meetings and activities, and contributed to tangible outcomes of BRICS cooperation.

4. We welcome the High-level Dialogue on Global Development at this Summit as  a testimony to the open and inclusive nature of BRICS Partnership including BRICS Outreach/BRICS Plus cooperation. We look forward to the Dialogue injecting new impetus to strengthen international cooperation and solidarity on implementing the 2030 Agenda  for Sustainable Development.

Strengthening and Reforming Global Governance

5. We reiterate our commitment to multilateralism through upholding  international law, including the purposes and principles enshrined in  the Charter of the United Nations as its indispensable cornerstone, and  to the central role of the United Nations in an international system in  which sovereign states cooperate to maintain peace and security, advance  sustainable development, ensure the promotion and protection of  democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, and promoting  cooperation based on the spirit of mutual respect, justice and equality.

6. Recalling the BRICS Joint Statement on Strengthening and Reforming the Multilateral System adopted by our Foreign Ministers in 2021 and the  principles outlined therein, we agree that the task of strengthening and reforming multilateral system encompasses the following:

  • Making instruments of global governance more inclusive, representative and  participatory to facilitate greater and more meaningful participation of  developing and least developed countries, especially in Africa, in global decision-making processes and structures and make it better attuned to contemporary realities;

  • Being based on inclusive consultation and collaboration for the benefit of all, while respecting sovereign independence, equality, mutual  legitimate interests and concerns to make the multilateral organizations more responsive,effective,transparent and credible;

  • Making multilateral organizations more responsive, effective, transparent,  democratic, objective, action-oriented, solution-oriented and credible,  so as to  promote cooperation in building international relations based  on the  norms and principles of international law, and the spirit of  mutual  respect, justice, equality, mutual beneficial cooperation and  realities  of  the  contemporary  world;

  • Using  innovative  and inclusive solutions, including digital and technological  tools to  promote sustainable development and facilitate affordable and  equitable  access to global public goods for all;

  • Strengthening  capacities  of individual States and international organizations to  better respond  to new and emerging, traditional and non-traditional  challenges,  including those emanating from terrorism, money  laundering,  cyber-realm, infodemics and fake news;

Promoting  international  and regional peace and security, social and economic  development, and  preserve nature’s balance with people-centered  international cooperation at its core.

7. We recall the UNGA Resolution 75/1 and reiterate the call for reforms of the principal  organs of the United Nations. We recommit to instill new life in the  discussions on reform of the UN Security Council and continue the work  to revitalize the General Assembly and strengthen the Economic and  Social Council. We recall the 2005 World Summit Outcome document and  reaffirm the need for a comprehensive reform of the UN, including its  Security Council, with a view to making it more representative,  effective and efficient, and to increase the representation of the  developing countries so that it can adequately respond to global  challenges. China and Russia reiterated the importance they attach to  the status and role of Brazil, India and South Africa in international  affairs and supported their aspiration to play a greater role in the UN. 

8. We appreciate the role of India and Brazil as members of the UN Security Council for 2021-2022 and  2022-2023 respectively. The presence of four BRICS countries in the UN  Security Council provides an opportunity to further enhance the weight of our dialogue on issue of international peace and security and for  continued cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including through regular exchanges amongst our permanent Mission to the United Nations and in other international fora.

9. We  reiterate the need for all countries to cooperate in promoting and protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms under the principles of  equality and mutual respect. We agree to continue to treat all human rights including the right to development in a fair and equal manner, on  the same footing and with the same emphasis. We agree to strengthen cooperation on issues of common interests both within BRICS and in  multilateral fora including the United Nations General Assembly and Human Rights Council, taking into account the necessity to promote,  protect and fulfil human rights in a non-selective, non-politicised and constructive manner and without double standards. We call for the  respect of democracy and human rights. In this regard, we underline that  they should be implemented on the level of global governance as well as  at national level. We reaffirm our commitment to ensuring the promotion  and protection of democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all with the aim to build a brighter shared future for the international community based on mutually beneficial cooperation.

10. We stress that global economic governance is of critical importance for countries to ensure sustainable development and recall further our  support for broadening and strengthening the participation of emerging markets and developing countries (EMDCs) in the international economic decision-making and norm-setting processes. We reiterate our support for G20’s leading role in global economic governance and underline that G20 shall remain intact and respond to current global challenges. We call  upon the international community to foster partnerships while underlining that it is imperative to strengthen macro-policy coordination in driving the world economy out of the crisis and shaping a strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive post-pandemic economic recovery. We urge major developed countries to adopt responsible economic policies, while managing policy spillovers, to avoid severe impacts on developing countries.

11. We reaffirm our support for an open, transparent, inclusive, non-discriminatory and rules-based multilateral trading system,as embodied in the World Trade Organization(WTO). We will engage constructively to pursue the necessary WTO reform to build an open world economy that supports trade and development, preserve the pre-eminent  role of the WTO for setting global trade rules and governance, supporting inclusive development and promoting the rights and interests of its members, including developing members and LDCs. We recognize that  special and differential treatment as established in WTO rules is a tool to facilitate the achievement of WTO objectives with respect to  economic growth and development. We call upon all WTO members to avoid unilateral and protectionist measures that run counter to the spirit and  rules of the WTO. We emphasize the top priority and urgency of launching the selection process of the Appellate Body members to restore  the binding two-tier multilateral dispute settlement mechanism. We agree that the Appellate Body crisis should be resolved without further  delay and should not be linked with other issues. We endorse BRICS Statement on Strengthening the Multilateral Trading System and Reforming  the WTO. We commend the successful conclusion of MC12 that underscores the value of multilateralism. We encourage WTO members to sustain momentum and achieve further meaningful outcomes by MC13.

12. We reaffirm our commitment to maintaining a strong and effective Global  Financial Safety Net with a quota-based and adequately resourced IMF at its center. We call for the timely and successful completion of the 16th General Review of Quotas by 15 December 2023, to reduce the IMF’s reliance on temporary resources, to address under-representation of emerging markets and developing countries (EMDCs) for their meaningful engagement in the governance of IMF and protect the voice and quota  shares of the poorest and smallest members. We welcome progress on voluntary channeling of Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) from countries with strong external positions to support countries most in need, as well as the IMF’s decision to establish the Resilience and Sustainability Trust (RST). We look forward to early operationalization of the RST.

13. We note that the COVID-19 pandemic has caused serious shock and hardship to humanity, unbalanced recovery is aggravating inequality across the world, the global growth momentum has weakened, and the economic prospects have declined. We are concerned that global development is suffering from severe disruption, including the widening North-South development gap, divergent recovery trajectories, pre-existing developmental fault-lines and a technological divide. This is posing huge challenges to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as economic and health scarring, particularly for EMDCs, is projected to persist beyond the current pandemic. We urge major developed countries to adopt responsible economic policies, while managing policy spillovers, to avoid severe impacts on developing countries. We encourage multilateral financial institutions and international organizations to play a constructive role in building global consensus on economic policies and preventing systemic risks of economic disruption and financial fragmentation. We welcome the actions to accelerate the progress towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Working in Solidarity to Combat COVID-19

14. We reiterate that it was imperative to ensure the availability of safe, efficacious, accessible and affordable diagnostics, medicines, vaccines and essential medical products to people from different countries especially developing countries, and equitable distribution of vaccines and expeditious vaccination, to fill the immunization gap globally. We support the leading role of the WHO in combating the pandemic, as well as acknowledge initiatives such as the COVAX and the ACT-A. We recognize the importance of the discussions in the WTO on relevant IP waiver proposals, as well as capacity building and strengthening local  production of vaccines and other health tools, especially in developing countries. We stress the need to continue to strengthen the cooperation on testing methods, therapeutic, research, production and recognition of vaccines, the research on their efficacy and safety in light of new variants of COVID-19 virus and recognition of national document of vaccination against COVID-19 and respective testing, especially for purpose of international travel. 

15. We reaffirm our commitment to multilateralism and continue to support  World Health Organization (WHO) to play the leading role in the global  health governance, while supporting other UN relevant agencies’  activities. The BRICS countries will strengthen technical multilateral  cooperation aimed at enhancing capacities in the fields of responding to major public health emergencies, Universal Health Coverage (UHC), vaccine research and development, prevention & therapeutic health care and digital health systems. We agree to deepen existing cooperation through establishing closer cooperation ties among BRICS health institutions and exploring opportunities for joint collaborative projects in the health sector. 

16. We welcome the convening of the BRICS High-Level Forum on Traditional Medicine.

17. We  stress that BRICS countries should be better prepared for COVID-19 and  future public health emergencies, and enhance exchanges and cooperation on public health emergency alert, pandemic prevention preparedness and response, and best practices in medical treatment. We welcome the virtual launch of the BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Center and commend the “Initiative on Strengthening Vaccine Cooperation and Jointly Building a Defensive Line against Pandemic”. We welcome the participation of other countries, especially EMDCs, in the Center to upgrade capacity for controlling and preventing infectious diseases. We support and emphasize the urgent need for the establishment of the BRICS Integrated Early Warning System for preventing mass infectious diseases risks in accordance with the International Health Regulations (2005) and the WHO’s Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network, and emphasize that BRICS countries should jointly take proactive and effective measures to prevent and reduce the risk of  cross-border transmission of infectious diseases and contribute to improving global health.

18. We support continuing to hold the BRICS TB Research Network Meetings, which will contribute to achieving the WHO goal of ending TB by 2030. We support the early signing of the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the Field of Regulation of Medical Products for Human Use among our drug regulatory authorities and welcome the holding of a BRICS Seminar of Officials and Experts in Population Development in the second half of 2022. 

19. We call on international  agencies and philanthropists to procure vaccines and boosters from manufacturers in developing countries, including in Africa, to ensure that the manufacturing capabilities being developed are retained. This is critical to build health system resilience and preparedness for emerging variants and any future health emergencies including pandemics. In this context access to diagnostics and therapeutics is essential to adopt quality and affordable medical countermeasures and develop overall surveillance capabilities. 

Safeguarding Peace and Security

20. We welcome the BRICS Joint Statement on “Strengthen BRICS Solidarity and Cooperation, Respond to New Features and Challenges in International Situation” adopted by our Foreign Ministers on 19 May 2022, and the 12th Meeting of BRICS National Security Advisers and High Representatives on National Security, held on 15 June 2022, and commend their fruitful discussions on various strategic issues. 

21. We commit to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of all States, stress our commitment to the peaceful resolution of differences  and disputes between countries through dialogue and consultation, support all efforts conducive to the peaceful settlement of crises.

22. We have discussed the situation in Ukraine and recall our national positions as expressed at the appropriate fora, namely the UNSC and  UNGA. We support talks between Russia and Ukraine. We have also discussed our concerns over the humanitarian situation in and around  Ukraine and expressed our support to efforts of the UN  Secretary-General, UN Agencies and ICRC to provide humanitarian assistance in accordance with the basic principles of humanity, neutrality and impartiality established in UN General Assembly resolution 46/182.

23. We strongly  support a peaceful, secure and stable Afghanistan while emphasizing the  respect for its sovereignty, independence, territorial  integrity, national unity and non-interference in its internal affairs.  We emphasize the need for all sides to encourage the  Afghanistan authorities to achieve national reconciliation through  dialogue and negotiation, and to establish a broad-based and inclusive  and representative political structure. We reaffirm the significance of  relevant UNSC resolutions. We emphasize that the Afghan territory not to  be used to threaten or attack any country or to shelter or train  terrorists, or to plan to finance terrorist acts, and reiterate the  importance of combating terrorism in Afghanistan. We call on the  Afghanistan authorities to work towards combating drug-related crime to  free Afghanistan from the scourge of drugs. We stress the need to  provide urgent humanitarian assistance to the Afghan people and to  safeguard the fundamental rights of all Afghans, including women, children, and different ethnic groups. 

24. We  reiterate the need to resolve the Iranian nuclear issue through  peaceful and diplomatic means in accordance with the international law,  and stress the importance of preserving the JCPOA and the UNSCR 2231 to  international non-proliferation as well as wider peace and stability and  hope for success of diplomatic efforts towards the resumption of  the JCPOA.

25. We express our support  for negotiations in bilateral and multilateral formats to resolve all  issues pertaining to the Korean Peninsula, including its complete  denuclearization, and maintaining peace and stability in Northeast Asia. We reaffirm the commitment to a comprehensive peaceful, diplomatic and  political solution to the situation.

26. We  reaffirm our commitment to a peaceful and prosperous Middle East and North Africa. We stress the importance of addressing development and  security challenges in the region. We call on the international community to support efforts aimed at the stability and peace in the region.

27. We commend efforts of  African countries, the African Union and sub-regional organizations to  address regional challenges, including maintaining peace and security,  post conflict reconstruction as well as development efforts, and call  for continued support by the international community to them. We  emphasize the collaboration of AU and UN in accordance with the UN Charter.

28. We call for continued efforts to strengthen the system of arms control, disarmament and  non-proliferation treaties and agreements and to preserve its integrity  for maintaining global stability and international peace and security,  and stressed further the need to maintain the effectiveness and  efficiency as well as the consensus-based nature of the relevant  multilateral instruments in the field of disarmament, non-proliferation  and arms control.

29. We call for  strengthening the system of arms control, disarmament and  non-proliferation, including the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological)  and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) and the Convention on  the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of  Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction (CWC), and for preserving  their integrity and effectiveness to maintain global stability and  international peace and security. We underline the need to comply with  and strengthen the BTWC, including by adopting a legally binding  Protocol to the Convention that provides for, inter alia, an efficient  verification mechanism. We reassert our support for ensuring the  long-term sustainability of outer space activities and prevention of an  arms race in outer space (PAROS) and of its weaponization, including  through negotiations to adopt a relevant legally binding multilateral  instrument. We recognize the value of the updated Draft Treaty on the  Prevention of the Placement of Weapons in Outer Space, the Threat or Use  of Force against Outer Space Objects (PPWT) submitted to the Conference  on Disarmament in 2014. We stress that practical Transparency and  Confidence-Building Measures (TCBMs), may also contribute to PAROS.

30. We  reaffirm our commitment to a world free of nuclear weapons and stress  our strong commitment to nuclear disarmament and our support to the work  on this subject during the session of 2022 of the Conference on  Disarmament. We note the Joint Statement of the Leaders of the People’s  Republic of China, the French Republic, the Russian Federation, the  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United  States on Preventing Nuclear War and Avoiding Arms Races on 3 January  2022, in particular the affirmation that a nuclear war cannot be won and  must never be fought.

31. We reaffirm  our commitment to the promotion of an open, secure, stable, accessible  and peaceful ICT-environment, underscored the importance of enhancing  common understandings and intensifying cooperation in the use of ICTs  and Internet. We support the leading role of the United Nations in  promoting constructive dialogue on ensuring ICT-security, including  within the UN Open-Ended Working Group on security of and in the use of  ICTs 2021-2025, and developing a universal legal framework in this  realm. We call for a comprehensive, balanced, objective approach to the  development and security of ICT products and systems. We underscore the  importance of establishing legal frameworks of cooperation among BRICS  countries on ensuring security in the use of ICTs. We also acknowledge  the need to advance practical intra-BRICS cooperation through implementation of the BRICS Roadmap of Practical Cooperation on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and the activities of the BRICS Working Group on security in the use of ICTs.

32. We, while emphasizing the formidable potential of the ICTs for growth and  development, recognize new associated possibilities they bring for  criminal activities and threats, and expressed concern over the rising  level and complexity of criminal misuse of ICTs. We welcome the ongoing  work in the UN Open-Ended Ad Hoc Committee of Experts to elaborate a  comprehensive international convention on countering the use of ICTs for  criminal purposes and reaffirm our commitment to cooperating in the  implementation of the mandate adopted by the UN General Assembly resolution 75/282.

33. We express strong  condemnation of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations whenever,  wherever and by whomsoever committed. We recognize the threat emanating  from terrorism, extremism conducive to terrorism and radicalization. We  are committed to combating terrorism in all its forms and  manifestations, including the cross-border movement of terrorists, and  terrorism financing networks and safe havens. We reiterate that  terrorism should not be associated with any religion, nationality,  civilization or ethnic group. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to  contribute further to the global efforts of preventing and countering  the threat of terrorism on the basis of respect for international law,  in particular the Charter of the United Nations, and human rights,  emphasizing that States have the primary responsibility in combating  terrorism with the United Nations continuing to play central and  coordinating role in this area. We also stress the need for a  comprehensive and balanced approach of the whole international community  to effectively curb the terrorist activities, which pose a serious  threat, including in the present-day pandemic environment. We reject  double standards in countering terrorism and extremism conducive to  terrorism. We call for an expeditious finalization and adoption of the  Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism within the UN  framework and for launching multilateral negotiations on an  international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and  biological terrorism, at the Conference of Disarmament. We welcome the  outcomes of the Seventh BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group Plenary  Meeting and its five Subgroup Meetings. We commend the Chair for hosting  the Seminar on Targeted Financial Sanctions Related to Terrorism and  Terrorist Financing, and look forward to organization of the Seminar on  Strengthening Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building in Developing  Countries, and the BRICS Police Training Program. We also look forward  to further deepening counter-terrorism cooperation.

34. We  look forward to further deepening counter-terrorism cooperation and  reaffirm the sole authority of the UN Security Council for imposing  sanctions and call for further consolidation and strengthening of the  working methods of UN Security Council Sanctions Committees to ensure  their effectiveness, responsiveness and transparency, while avoiding  politicization of any of their proceedings including listing proposals  objectively on evidence-based criteria.

35. We  reaffirm our commitment to strengthening international cooperation  against corruption. While respecting the legal systems of our respective  countries, we are committed to strengthening experience sharing and  practical cooperation on issues related to anti-corruption law  enforcement, including on pursuit of economic and corruption offenders,  on mutual legal assistance in civil and administrative matters, and on  asset recovery. We welcome the BRICS Initiative on Denial of Safe Haven  to Corruption. We will further strengthen anti-corruption capacity  building through education and training programs and enhance  anti-corruption exchanges and cooperation within multilateral  frameworks. We welcome the first BRICS Anti-corruption Ministerial  Meeting. 

36. We are concerned about the  serious drug situation in the world and reiterate our commitment to the  existing international drug control mechanism underpinned by the three  United Nations Drug Control Conventions and the various political  commitments. We appreciate BRICS Anti-Drug Working Group’s active role  in combating transnational drug trafficking and promoting global drug  governance and will further strengthen drug control cooperation.

Promoting Economic Recovery

37. We  recognize the important role of BRICS countries working together to  deal with risks and challenges to the world economy in achieving global  recovery and sustainable development. We reaffirm our commitment to  continuing to enhance macro-economic policy coordination, deepen  economic practical cooperation, and work to realize strong, sustainable,  balanced and inclusive post-COVID economic recovery. We emphasize the  importance of continued implementation of the Strategy for BRICS  Economic Partnership 2025 in all relevant ministerial tracks and working  groups.

38. We recognize the dynamism  of the digital economy in mitigating the impact of COVID-19 and enabling  global economic recovery. We also recognize the positive role that  trade and investment can play in promoting sustainable development,  national and regional industrialization, the transition towards  sustainable consumption and production patterns. We take note of China’s  hosting the "Buy BRICS" online promotion event and endorse the BRICS  Digital Economy Partnership Framework, BRICS Initiative on Trade and  Investment for Sustainable Development and BRICS Initiative on Enhancing  Cooperation on Supply Chains. We recognize the challenges facing trade  and investment development in the digital era and acknowledge that BRICS  members are at different levels of digital development, and thus  recognize the need to address respective challenges including the  digital divide. We welcome the establishment of the Digital Economy  Working Group by upgrading the E-commerce Working Group. We also agree  to promote consumer protection in e-commerce by advancing the  implementation of BRICS Framework for Consumer Protection in  E-commerce. We reaffirm that openness, efficiency, stability,  transparency, reliability and resilience of the global, regional and  national production and supply chains are crucial in combating the  COVID-19 pandemic, tackling economic recovery challenges and boosting  international trade and investment. We encourage cooperation among BRICS  countries to enhance the interconnectivity of supply chains and promote  trade and investment flows. We agree to strengthen exchanges and  cooperation in trade in services and engagement of BRICS national focal  points, as established in the BRICS Framework for Cooperation on Trade  in Services, with the BRICS Business Council with the aim to promote  implementation of BRICS Trade in Services Cooperation Roadmap and  relevant documents including the BRICS Framework for cooperation in  Trade in Professional Services. We take note of the proposal of the  Chair to establish the BRICS Trade in Services Network (BTSN) and will  continue discussions. 

39. We  congratulate New Development Bank (NDB) on its relocation to its  permanent headquarters building in Shanghai as well as the opening of  NDB’s regional office in India. We welcome the decisions on admission of  four new members to the NDB and look forward to further membership  expansion in a gradual and balanced manner in terms of geographic  representation and comprising of both developed and developing  countries, to enhance the NDB’s international influence as well as the  representation and voice of EMDCs in global governance. We support the  NDB’s goals of attaining the highest possible credit rating and  institutional development. We appreciate the vital role of the NDB in  addressing the impact of the pandemic and assisting in the economic  recovery in member countries. We note the second General Strategy  approved by the Board of Governors at its annual meeting and look  forward to its smooth implementation. We encourage the Bank to follow  the member-led and demand-driven principle, mobilize financing from  diversified sources, enhance innovation and knowledge exchange, assist  member countries in achieving sustainable development goals and further  improve efficiency and effectiveness to fulfill its mandate, aiming to  be a premier multilateral development institution.

40. We  welcome the decision to establish the BRICS Think Tank Network for  Finance. We expect it to work independently and provide intellectual  support, as and when tasked, for knowledge sharing, exchange of  experiences and practices and cooperation on finance issues amongst  BRICS countries, aiming at addressing global challenges and serving the  interests of the EMDCs.

41. We recognize  the key role that infrastructure investment can play in facilitating  sustainable development. We reaffirm our understanding that PPPs are an  effective approach to leveraging the private sector to address  infrastructure gaps, and scaling up infrastructure assets. We endorse  the Technical Report on Public Private Partnerships for Sustainable  Development. We welcome the exchange and sharing of good practices and  experiences, and encourage further cooperation on infrastructure  investment and PPPs. We look forward to resuming technical  engagements with the NDB and the BRICS Task Force on PPP and  Infrastructure on the Integrated Digital Platform on infrastructure  investment projects and call for intensification of work in this area.

42. We  acknowledge the importance of strengthening the Contingent Reserve  Arrangement (CRA) mechanism, which contributes to strengthening the  global financial safety net and complements existing international  monetary and financial arrangements. We support the amendments to the  CRA Treaty, and welcome the progress in amending other relevant CRA  documents. We look forward to the finalization of the amendments which  would enhance the flexibility and responsiveness of the CRA mechanism.  We look forward to the successful completion of the fifth CRA test run  later in 2022. We support the work to improve the framework for  coordination between the CRA and the IMF. We welcome the progress in  developing the BRICS Economic Bulletin 2022 as part of our streamlined  CRA research program.

43. We underscore  the importance of continued work under the existing work streams,  including information security in the financial sector, and the BRICS  Payments Task Force (BPTF) as a platform for exchanging experience and  knowledge, and welcome the central banks’ further cooperation on the  payments track. 

44. We commit to  strengthening intra-BRICS cooperation to intensify the BRICS Partnership  on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR) and collectively create new  opportunities for development. We encourage intra-BRICS cooperation in  human resource development through BRICS Centre for Industrial  Competences, BRICS PartNIR Innovation Centre (BPIC), BRICS Start-up  Events and collaboration with other relevant BRICS mechanisms, to carry  out training programmes to address challenges of NIR for inclusive and  sustainable industrialization. We support the BRICS PartNIR projects to  explore cooperation mechanisms with New Development Bank (NDB) and other  financial institutions based on market-driven principles. We recognize  the importance of BRICS Startup Events including BRICS Innovation  Launchpad and BRICS Startup Forum Meeting, aimed to promote networking,  interaction, mentorship among Startups in BRICS countries. We welcome  the events hosted by the BPIC including the 4th BRICS Forum on PartNIR,  the BRICS Industrial Innovation Contest 2022, and the BPIC training  programme, which are aimed at translating the vision of PartNIR into  real actions and benefits for all BRICS members. We welcome the BRICS  Forum on Development of Industrial Internet and Digital Manufacturing,  during which representatives from BRICS governments, industry and  academia participated and discussed the development of digital  manufacturing. We also welcome the release of the BRICS Initiative for  Cooperation on Digitalization of Manufacturing.

45. We  acknowledge the progress of BRICS cooperation on STI, including  outcomes of BRICS STI Steering Committee, inter alia, on advancement of  flagship projects initiative aiming to find effective STI solutions to  global challenges. We encourage further work on proposals regarding the  polycentric BRICS Technology Transfer Center Network, iBRICS Network,  joint research projects including flagship projects, BRICS Young  Scientist Forum and Young Innovation Prize.

46. We  commend the progress of cooperation in the field of ICTs, including the  adoption of the terms of reference of the Digital BRICS Task Force  (DBTF) and the decision to hold the Digital BRICS Forum in 2022. We  encourage the BRICS Institute of Future Networks and the DBTF to make  suitable working plans at an early date, and carry out cooperation on  R&D and application of new and emerging technologies. We look  forward to a fruitful and productive meeting of BRICS Communication  Ministers in July 2022. We support the coordination and interaction  among the Digital Economy Working Group and the Working Group on ICT  Cooperation, as well as the workstreams established within this track,  namely the DBTF and the BIFN as practicable to avoid any duplication for  advancing the BRICS digital economy in accordance with respective  advantages, and within respective domestic legal frameworks.

47. We  commend our Customs authorities for the Agreement Between the  Governments of BRICS Countries on Cooperation and Mutual Administrative  Assistance in Customs Matters, and the progress made in areas of mutual  administrative assistance, capacity building and law enforcement  cooperation. We recognize the importance of BRICS customs enforcement  cooperation and will work together to further strengthen it. We support  our Customs authorities in holding the BRICS Workshop on Customs  Strategy and Capacity Building and the BRICS Workshop on Customs  Enforcement Cooperation, for smart cooperation and smart practice  sharing, as also for promoting partnership in customs under the theme of  “Smart Cooperation for a High-quality Partnership among BRICS Customs”.

48. We  emphasize the fundamental role of energy security in achieving  sustainable development goals. While recognizing that the energy  transition of each country is unique according to national  circumstances, we underscore the prime importance of securing universal  access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy in line  with Sustainable Development Goal 7. We welcome the BRICS Energy Report  2022, support joint research and technical cooperation within the BRICS  Energy Research Cooperation Platform, and commend the holding of the  BRICS Youth Energy Summit and other related activities.

49. We  encourage the BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism to continue playing  an important role in supporting BRICS economic and trade cooperation,  and appreciate the renewal of the Memorandum of Understanding between  the Member Development Banks of BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism  and the New Development Bank. We welcome the seventh edition of the  BRICS Economic Research Award to encourage and stimulate advanced  doctoral research by nationals of the BRICS countries on topics of  relevance to the BRICS nations.

50. We reiterate the commitments to promote employment for sustainable  development, including to develop skills to ensure resilient recovery,  gender-responsive employment and social protection policies including  workers’ rights. We welcome research by the BRICS Network of Labour  Research Institutes on employment and income support in the context of  COVID-19 crisis outlining impact of the pandemic, response measures and  post-COVID-19 changes.

51. We recognize  the crucial role that MSMEs play in the BRICS economies and reaffirm the  importance of their participation in production networks and value  chains. We agree to continue to deepen cooperation on competition  amongst BRICS countries and create a fair competition market environment  for international economic and trade cooperation. We agree to enhance  exchanges and cooperation in the field of standardization and make full  use of standards to advance sustainable development. We commit to  strengthen cooperation and coordination in areas of tax information  exchange, capacity building and innovation in tax administration, and  create a signature knowledge product called ‘the Best Tax Practices from  BRICS’ to serve as reference for other developing countries. We support  deepening IPR cooperation and promoting exchanges and mutual learning  on IPR protection system, and look forward to more practical outcomes in  such fields as patent, trademark, and industrial design. We support  enhancing BRICS statistical cooperation and continuing to release the  BRICS Joint Statistical Publication 2022.

Expediting Implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

52. We  note with concern that the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted efforts to  achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and reversed years  of progress on poverty, hunger, health care, education, climate change,  access to clean water, and environmental protection. We reaffirm our  commitment to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda in all its three  dimensions - economic, social and environmental - in a balanced and  integrated manner. We stress that the international community should  attach more importance to development, revitalize global development  partnerships and push for realization of all sustainable development  goals by pooling the necessary resources to instill fresh momentum into  implementing the 2030 Agenda. We urge donor countries to honour their  Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments and to facilitate  capacity building and the transfer of technology along with additional  development resources to developing countries, in line with the national  policy objectives of recipients. We stress the importance of dialogue  between the relevant development agencies from the BRICS countries.

53. We  commemorate the 30th anniversary of the United Nations Framework  Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and call on all parties to adhere  to the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and  respective capabilities, in the light of different national  circumstances and in accordance with the institutional arrangement of  nationally determined contributions, and to implement the UNFCCC and its  Paris Agreement in an accurate, balanced and comprehensive way, based  on existing consensus. We recall relevant provisions of the Paris  Agreement, emphasizing that the Paris Agreement aims to strengthen  global response to the threat of climate change in the context of  sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty, and that  peaking of Green House Gas (GHG) emissions will take longer for  developing countries. We underline that the developed countries have  historical responsibilities for global climate change, and should take  the lead in scaling up mitigation actions and scale up indispensable  support to developing countries on finance, technology and  capacity-building. We express our support to the incoming Egyptian  Presidency of COP27, working towards the success of COP27, and promote  COP27 to prioritize implementation and highlight the reinforcement of  adaptation and delivery and enhancement of developed countries’  commitments to provide financial support and technology transfer to  developing countries.

54. We oppose  green trade barriers and reiterate our commitment to enhancing  coordination on these issues. We underline that all measures taken to  tackle climate change and bio-diversity loss must be designed, adopted  and implemented in full conformity with the WTO agreements and must not  constitute a means of arbitrary or unjustifiable discrimination or a  disguised restriction on international trade and must not create  unnecessary obstacles to international trade. We express our concern at  any discriminatory measure that will distort international trade, risk  new trade frictions and shift burden of addressing climate change to  other trading partners, developing countries and BRICS members. 

55. We  acknowledge the positive outcomes of the first phase of the 15th  Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological  Diversity (COP15) and its Kunming Declaration. We welcome and support  China’s hosting of the second phase of COP15 and call on all parties to  jointly adopt an ambitious, balanced and practical Post-2020 Global  Biodiversity Framework.

56. As BRICS  countries produce around 1/3 of the world’s food, we stress our  commitment to furthering agricultural cooperation and driving  sustainable agricultural and rural development of BRICS countries aimed  at safeguarding food security of BRICS countries and the world. We  emphasize the strategic importance of agriculture inputs, including,  inter alia, fertilizers, on ensuring global food security. We reiterate  the importance of implementing the Action Plan 2021-2024 for  Agricultural Cooperation of BRICS Countries, and welcome the Strategy on  Food Security Cooperation of the BRICS Countries.

57. We  take note that the breakthroughs in the applications of digital  technologies, such as Big Data and Artificial Intelligence (AI) may play  an important role towards sustainable development. We take note of the  BRICS Forum on Big Data for Sustainable Development. We support  information exchanges and technical cooperation on AI technology. We  recall the declaration of the 7th BRICS Communications Ministers meeting  recognizing the rapid developments and huge potential of Artificial  Intelligence technologies and its value to economic growth. We  acknowledge the need to cooperate with each other to build trust,  confidence and security, as well as transparency and accountability in  promoting trustworthy AI to maximize its potential for the benefit of  society and humanity as whole with specific emphasis on marginalized and  vulnerable groups of population. We express our concerns on the risk,  and ethical dilemma related to Artificial Intelligence, such as privacy,  manipulation, bias, human-robot interaction, employment, effects and  singularity among others. We encourage BRICS members to work together to  deal with such concerns, sharing best practices, conduct comparative  study on the subject toward developing a common governance approach  which would guide BRICS members on Ethical and responsible use of  Artificial Intelligence while facilitating the development of AI. 

58. We  welcome the establishment of the BRICS Joint Committee on Space  Cooperation in line with the Agreement on Cooperation on BRICS Remote  Sensing Satellite Constellation and the convening of the first joint  committee meeting. We are satisfied with the formulation of working  procedures for data exchange and joint observation of the BRICS Remote  Sensing Satellite Constellation and appreciate the commissioning of data  sharing and exchange of the constellation. We encourage BRICS space  authorities to continue to effectively utilize the capacity of the  Constellation, and to widely promote application with data of the  Constellation, aimed at facilitating the sustainable development of  BRICS countries.

59. We commend the  proposal to organize the BRICS High-level Forum on Sustainable  Development. Taking it as an opportunity, we look forward to deepening  cooperation on, inter alia, the fight against COVID-19, digital  transformation, resilience and stability of industrial and supply  chains and low-carbon development.

60. We  reiterate the importance of exchanges and dialogues among BRICS  disaster management authorities. We encourage cooperation in key areas  including comprehensive disaster reduction capacity, disaster resilient  infrastructure and emergency rescue and response, with a view to  improving the global and regional disaster management response.

61. We  express our support to the African Union Agenda 2063 and to Africa´s  efforts towards integration through the development of the African  Continental Free Trade Area and other means. We stress the importance of  issues including industrialization, infrastructure development, food  security, health-care, and tackling climate change for the sustainable  development of Africa. We support Africa in attaining economic recovery  and sustainable development in the post pandemic era.

Deepening People-to-People Exchanges

62. We  reaffirm the importance of BRICS people-to-people exchanges in  enhancing mutual understanding, friendship and cooperation amongst our  nations and people. We appreciate the progress made under China’s  Chairship in 2022, including in the fields of governance, culture,  education, sports, arts, films, media, youth and academic exchanges, and  look forward to further exchanges and cooperation in these areas. 

63. We  appreciate the signing of the Action Plan for the Implementation of the  Agreement between the Governments of the BRICS States on cooperation in  the Field of Culture (2022-2026), encourage the BRICS countries to  promote the development of digitalization in the field of culture,  continue to deepen cooperation in the fields of, inter alia, arts and  culture, cultural heritage, cultural industry and cultural alliances  under the framework of the action plan, and establish a cultural  partnership featuring inclusiveness and mutual learning. 

64. We  acknowledge the urgent need for tourism industry recovery and the  importance of increasing mutual tourist flows and will work towards  further strengthening the BRICS Alliance for Green Tourism to promote  measures, which can shape a more resilient, sustainable and inclusive tourism sector. 

65. We appreciate the  progress on education and Technical and Vocational Education and  Training (TVET) cooperation, especially the establishment of the BRICS  TVET Cooperation Alliance which focuses on strengthening communication  and dialogue in TVET, promoting substantial cooperation in TVET,  integrating TVET with industry, enhancing research collaboration and  supporting recognition of TVET standards. Also, the launch of the BRICS  Skills Competition will strengthen exchanges and cooperation among the  nations. We support the digital transformation in education and  TVET space, and commit to ensure education accessibility and equity, and  promote the development of quality education. We reiterate the  importance of digitalization in education and development of a  sustainable education by strengthening the cooperation within BRICS  Network University and BRICS University League.

66. We  commend the successful holding of the BRICS Business Forum and  welcome the Beijing Initiative of BRICS Business community. We encourage  the BRICS Business Council to strengthen cooperation, including in the fields of agri-business, aviation, deregulation, digital economy, energy  and green economy, financial services, infrastructure, manufacturing, and skills development. We appreciate contributions and activities of  the BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (WBA) to deepening BRICS economic and trade cooperation. We welcome the holding of the second BRICS  Women’s Innovation Contest by the BRICS Women’s Business Alliance towards empowering women’s innovation and entrepreneurship. 

67. We commend the progress in sports exchanges and the role it plays in the  development of our athletes in a fair, inclusive and non-discriminatory  fashion. We look forward to the successful holding of BRICS Sports  Ministers Meeting in 2022.

68. We  appreciate the holding of the fora pertaining to political parties,  think tanks, and civil society organizations. We also acknowledge the  proposal for institutionalization of the BRICS Civil Society  Organizations Forum.

69. We support the  convening of the fifth BRICS Media Forum and the continuation of the  BRICS International Journalism Training Program within the framework of the Forum.

70. We look forward to the  BRICS Youth Summit, support youth development as a priority and  encourage strengthened exchanges among BRICS youth. We welcome the BRICS  Film Festival in Shanghai and look forward to enhancing exchanges and  cooperation in the field of film. We commend the progress made by BRICS  countries in promoting urban development, and appreciate the  contribution of mechanisms including BRICS Urbanization Forum, BRICS  Friendship Cities and Local Governments Cooperation Forum and BRICS  International Municipal Forum to facilitating the building of more  friendship city relations among BRICS countries and promoting the  implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Institutional Development

71. We  note with satisfaction the progress made in BRICS institutional  development and stress that BRICS cooperation needs to embrace changes  and keep abreast with the times. We shall continue to set clear  priorities in our wide-ranging cooperation, on the basis of consensus,  and make our strategic partnership more efficient, practical  and results-oriented. 

72. We emphasize  the BRICS efforts of extending its cooperation to other EMDCs and  support further promoting the BRICS Outreach and BRICS Plus  Cooperation in line with the updated Terms of Reference adopted by the  BRICS Sherpas in 2021 through inclusive and equal-footed and flexible  practices and initiatives. We commend China’s Chairship for hosting the  Dialogue session under the theme ‘Increased Role of Emerging Markets and  Developing Countries in Global Governance’ during the Meeting of BRICS  Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations on 19 May 2022. 

73. We support promoting discussions among BRICS members on BRICS expansion  process. We stress the need to clarify the guiding principles,  standards, criteria and procedures for this expansion process through  Sherpas’ channel on the basis of full consultation and consensus.

74. South Africa, Brazil, Russia and India commend China’s BRICS Chairship in  2022 and express their gratitude to the government and people of China  for holding the XIV BRICS Summit.

75. Brazil, Russia, India and China extend full support to South Africa for its  BRICS Chairship in 2023 and the holding of the XV BRICS Summit.


(Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China)

XIII BRICS Summit New Delhi Declaration

September 9, 2021

Preamble

1. We, the Leaders of the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Russian Federation, the Republic of India, the People's Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa held the XIII BRICS Summit under the theme ‘BRICS @ 15: Intra-BRICS Cooperation for Continuity, Consolidation and Consensus’ on 9 September 2021 under the Chairship of the Republic of India.

2. On the landmark occasion of the 15th anniversary of BRICS, we reiterate our commitment to enhancing intra-BRICS cooperation under the three pillars- political and security, economic and financial, and cultural & people-to-people exchanges. Recalling our shared values of peace, rule of law, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and democracy for all, we pledge to promote a more inclusive, equitable and representative multipolar international system with the United Nations at its center, based on international law andpurposes and principles of the UN Charter, in particular the sovereign equality of all States and respect for their territorial integrity, with the aim to build a brighter shared future for the international community based on mutually beneficial cooperation.

3. We appreciate that despite the ongoing challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, BRICS has maintained momentum and continuity, while consolidating its activities in the spirit of consensus in 2021. We welcome the signing of the Agreement on BRICS Cooperation on Remote Sensing Satellite Constellation, finalization of the Agreement on BRICS Cooperation and Mutual Administrative Assistance in Customs Matters and the discussion on Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the field of Regulation of Medical Products for Human Use. We also commend, among other achievements, the adoption of and/or agreement on the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Action Plan, Action Plan2021-2024 for Agricultural Cooperation, Innovation Cooperation Action Plan 2021-2024 and the BRICS Alliance for Green Tourism. We reaffirm our commitment to implement the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2021-25 under the various existing Ministerial tracks and Working Groups. We also welcome the launch of the BRICS Agricultural Research Platform and ongoing discussion on the BRICS Platform for Digital Public Goods.

4. We welcome the outcomes of over 100events (Annex II) Urdu.pdf, including at the Ministerial and other high-level Meetings, held so far this year in the areas of Foreign Affairs, National Security, Finance, Trade, Industry, Labour and Employment, Agriculture, Energy, Health including Traditional Medicines, Environment, Education,Customs, Youth, Culture and Tourism as well as a range of important deliverables in various fields (Annex I) Urdu.pdf aimed at further strengthening the BRICS Strategic Partnership for the mutual benefit of its participating States and peoples.

Consolidation and Stocktaking

5. We recognize that the 15th anniversary milestone is an opportune moment for us to take pride in our many achievements, including the creation of successful mechanisms such as the New Development Bank (NDB), the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA), the Energy Research Cooperation Platform, Partnership for New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR) and the Science, Technology and Innovation Framework, to name but a few, while also reflecting on the way forward. We commend India for taking forward the work of previous rotational BRICS Chairs on consolidating BRICS activities across its various institutional platforms and mechanisms to enhance their relevance, greater efficiency and improved efficacyand acknowledge the importance of such activities. We commend the adoption by our Sherpas of the revised Terms of Reference for guiding BRICS engagement going forward on its working methods, scope of engagement and the Chair’s mandate. We reiterate our commitment to preserving and further strengthening the consensus-based working methods in BRICS at all levels which have been the hallmark of our cooperation. We commend India for emphasising the principles of Continuity, Consolidation and Consensus in the theme for its Chairship this year.

Global Health Challenges & COVID-19

6. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued to wreak immeasurable political, economic, and social damage globally for almost two years. We express our solidarity with, and deepest condolences to the victims of the pandemic, including those whose lives and livelihoods have been affected. We call for better international preparedness and enhanced cooperation to fight the pandemic and other current and future health challenges through themobilization of political support and necessary financial resources.

7. We emphasise that the international community has a collective responsibility to work together against the COVID-19 pandemic in the true spirit of partnership within existing international frameworks including the WHO. We note that the cooperation on study of origins of the SARS-COV-2 is an important aspect of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic. We support science-based, inclusive of broad expertise, transparent, and timely processes, free from politicization or interference, to strengthen international capabilities to better understand the emergence of novel pathogens and to help prevent future pandemics.

8. We acknowledge that in an interconnected and globalized world, no one is safe until everyone is safe. Recognizing that the production of COVID-19 vaccines has provided the greatest hope to conquer the pandemic and that COVID-19 extensive immunization is a global public good, we regret the glaring inequity in access to vaccines, diagnostics and therapeutics, especially for the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations. We, therefore, recognize the importance of safe, efficacious, accessible and affordable vaccines. In this regard, we note, inter alia, the ongoing discussions in the WTO on a COVID-19 vaccine Intellectual Property Rights waiver and the use of flexibilities of the TRIPS Agreement and the Doha Declaration on TRIPS Agreement and Public Health. We also stressthe importanceof science-based, andobjective assessment ofthe safety, and efficacy of vaccines by regulatorsthroughout the world.

9. We reaffirm our strong commitment to continue our ongoingefforts in supporting countries around the world to combat the pandemic through financing, donation, local production and facilitating export ofvaccines, therapeutics, diagnostics and other life saving equipment and welcome the contribution made by BRICS countries in providing over a billionCOVID-19 vaccine doses, including grants and donations, bilaterally, to international organisations and to the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access (COVAX) facility.

10. We note with satisfaction intra-BRICS cooperation to strengthen preparedness and response to the pandemic, including in vaccine cooperation and welcome the progress towards the early launch of the BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Centrein a virtual format. We support the progress towards establishing a BRICS Integrated Early Warning System for preventing mass infectious diseases risks, in accordance with the International Health Regulations (2005), and the WHO’s Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network, for identifying future pandemics and forecasting outbreaks through institutional collaboration. We stress the importance of international effortson mutual recognition of national documents of vaccination against COVID-19 and respective testing, especially for purpose of international travel.

11. Wecongratulate India for convening the BRICS Digital Health Summit and welcome its outcomes, including on strengthening cooperation on application at the national-level of digital health systems for a singular multi-faceted holistic framework with simple user interface across all platforms and with safeguarded data, as well ason pandemic management by leveraging digital technologies.

12. We reiterate our commitment to enhance BRICS cooperation in addressing other health challenges, including through developing effective joint responses to the continuing spread of major diseases,specially Tuberculosis (TB), and commend the work done by the BRICS TB Research Network in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We recognizethe importance of experience and knowledge-sharingat the BRICS Symposium on Traditional Medicines, the High-Level Segment on Traditional Medicines and the Meeting of BRICS Experts on Traditional Medicines and encourage further exchanges in the area of traditional medicines.

Strengthening and Reforming the Multilateral System

13. We acknowledge that, despite the many successes of the UN system and its associated architecture, its continued relevance would be determined by its ability to adapt to contemporary realities and respond to the evolving and inter-connected challenges of our time. We, therefore, pledge our resolve towards strengthening and reforming the multilateral system to make global governance more responsive and agile, effective, transparent, democratic,representative and accountable to Member States, while reiterating our commitment to upholding international law, including the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nationsas its indispensable cornerstone, and to the central role of the United Nations in the international system. The pandemic has reinforced our belief that effective and representative multilateralism is essential for building resilience against current and future global challenges, promoting well-being of our people and building a sustainable future for the planet.

14. We endorse the BRICS Joint Statement on Strengthening and Reforming the Multilateral System adopted by our Foreign Ministers and, recalling the principles outlined therein, we agree that the task of strengthening and reforming multilateral system encompasses the following:

· Making instruments of global governance more inclusive, representative and participatory to facilitate greater and more meaningful participation of developing and least developed countries, especially Africa, in global decision-making processes and structures and make it better attuned to contemporary realities;

· Being based on inclusive consultation and collaboration for the benefit of all, while respecting sovereign independence, equality, mutual legitimate interests and concerns to make the multilateral organizations more responsive, effective, transparent and credible;

· Making multilateral organizations more responsive, effective, transparent, democratic, objective, action-oriented, solution-oriented and credible, so as to promote cooperation in building international relations based on the norms and principles of international law, and the spirit of mutual respect, justice, equality, mutual beneficial cooperation and realities of the contemporary world;

· Using innovative and inclusive solutions, including digital and technological tools to promote sustainable development and facilitate affordable and equitable access to global public goods for all;

· Strengthening capacities of individual States and international organizations to better respond to new and emerging, traditional and non-traditional challenges, including those emanating from terrorism, money laundering, cyber-realm, infodemics and fake news;

· Promoting international and regional peace and security, social and economic development, and preserve nature’s balance with people-centered international cooperation at its core.

15. We recall the UNGA Resolution 75/1 and reiterate the call for reforms of the principal organs of the United Nations. We recommit to instil new life in the discussions on reform of the UN Security Council and continue the work to revitalize the General Assembly and strengthen the Economic and Social Council. We recall the 2005 World Summit Outcome document and reaffirm the need for a comprehensive reform of the UN, including its Security Council, with a view to making it more representative, effective and efficient, and to increase the representation of developing countries so that it can adequately respond to global challenges. China and Russia reiterate the importance they attach to the status and role of Brazil, India and South Africa in international affairs and supported their aspiration to play a greater role in the UN.

16. We appreciate the role of South Africa and India during their membership of the UN Security Council for 2019-2020 and 2021-2022 respectively,and congratulate Brazil on its election as a member of the UN Security Council in 2022-2023. The presence of four BRICS countries in the UN Security Council in 2022 will provide an opportunity to further enhance the weight of our dialogue on issues of international peace and security and for continued cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including through regular exchanges amongst our Permanent Missions to the United Nations and in other international fora.

17. We reaffirm our commitment to a strong Global Financial Safety Net with a quota-based and adequately resourced IMF at its center, and express our deep disappointment at the failure in addressing the quota and governance reforms under the 15th General Review of Quotas (GRQ). We call for the timely and successful completion of the 16th GRQ by December 15, 2023, to reduce the IMF’s reliance on temporary resources and to address under-representation of EMDCsfor their meaningful engagement in the governance of IMF and to protect the voice and quota shares of its poorest and smallest members and have a new quota formula that better reflects the economic weight of members. We welcome the IMF’s approval of a general allocation of Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) equivalent to USD 650 billion. We recognize the urgency to strengthen its capability to meet the financing needs of countries during future crisis in a transparent and accountable manner.

18. We reaffirm our support for a transparent, rules-based, open, inclusive and non-discriminatory multilateral trading system, with the World Trade Organization at its core, and in this regard reiterate our support for the necessary and urgent reform which would, inter alia, preserve the centrality, core values and fundamental principles of the WTO and consider the interests of all members, including developing countries and LDCs, recognizing that the majority of the WTO members are developing countries. It is critical that all WTO members avoid unilateral and protectionist measures that run counter to the spirit and rules of the WTO. We emphasize the primary importance of ensuring the restoration and preservation of the normal functioning of a two-stage WTO Dispute Settlement system, including the expeditious appointment of all Appellate Body members.

19. We recognize that the current global challenges, particularly the COVID-19 pandemic, are a powerful reminder of the imperative to strengthen cooperation amongst States. While acknowledging the measures taken by the WHO, governments, non-profit organisations, academia, business and industry in combating the pandemic, we also expect the international community to reform and strengthen policy responses of WHO to fight the COVID-19 pandemic and other current and future health challenges.

20. We call for continued efforts to strengthen the system of arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation treaties and agreements and to preserve its integrity for maintaining global stability and international peace and security, to maintain the effectiveness and efficiency as well as the consensus-based nature of the relevant multilateral instruments in the field of disarmament, non-proliferation and arms control.

Peace, Security and Counter-Terrorism Cooperation

21. We note that BRICS has continued its active dialogue on topical issues of peace and security in relevant mechanisms. We welcome the outcomes of the meeting of the BRICS High Representatives for Security and commend them for their meaningful discussions on counter-terrorism, security in the use of ICTs, threats to global, regional and national security, prospects for cooperation among law enforcement agencies and prospects for cooperation among BRICS Member States on health safety and healthcare. We also welcome their decision to adopt the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Action Plan for the implementation of the BRICS Counter Terrorism Strategy.

22. We express our concern at the continuing conflicts and violence in different parts of the world.We endorse the position taken by our Foreign Ministers at their last meeting on the situation in Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, the Palestinian-Israeli issue, the Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen, Afghanistan, Korean Peninsula, the Iran nuclear issue and Myanmar. Wereaffirm our commitment to the principles of non-interference in the internal affairs of States andreiterate that all conflicts must be resolved by peaceful means and through political and diplomatic effortsin line with international law, in particular the UN Charter. We underscore the inadmissibility of the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

23. We follow with concern the latest developments in Afghanistan. We call for refraining from violence and settling the situation by peaceful means. We stress the need to contribute to fostering an inclusive intra-Afghan dialogue so as to ensure stability, civil peace, law and order in the country. We condemn in the strongest terms the terrorist attacks near the Hamid Karzai Kabul International Airport that resulted in a large number of deaths and injuries. We underscore the priority of fighting terrorism, including preventing attempts by terrorist organisations touse Afghan territory as terrorist sanctuaryand to carry out attacks against other countries, as well as drug trade within Afghanistan. We emphasise the need to address the humanitarian situation and to uphold human rights, including those of women, children and minorities.

24. We reiterate the importance of preserving the JCPOA towards the international and regional peace and stability, and the need to resolve the Iran nuclear issue through peaceful and diplomatic means in accordance with international law.

25. We reaffirm the importance of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) and underline the need to comply with and strengthen it, including by adopting a legally binding Protocol that provides for, inter alia, an efficient verification mechanism. We also reaffirm support for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and call upon the State Parties to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) to uphold the Convention and the integrity of the CWC and engage in a constructive dialogue with a view to restoring the spirit of consensus in the OPCW.

26. We confirm the commitment to ensure prevention of an arms race in outer space and its weaponization, and the long-term sustainability of outer space activities, including through the adoption of a relevant multilateral legally binding instrument. In this regard, we notethe draft Treaty on the Prevention of the Placement of Weapons in Outer Space, the Threat or Use of Force against Outer Space Objects.We reaffirm our support to the Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Explorations and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies. We stand together for the long-term sustainability of outer space activities and enhancing safety of space operations through implementation and development of the relevant UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) guidelines.

27. We reaffirm our commitment to the promotion of an open, secure, stable, accessible, and peaceful ICT environment.We reiterate the need of a comprehensive and balanced approach to ICTs development and security, including technical advancement, business development, of safeguarding the security of States and public interests, and of respecting the right to privacy of individuals.Weunderscore the leading role of the United Nations in promoting dialogue, to forge common understandings in the security of and in the use of ICTs and development of universally agreed norms, rules and principles for responsible behaviour of States in the realm of ICTs, without prejudice to other relevant international fora. In this regard we welcome the successful conclusion of the work of the UN Open Ended Working Group (OEWG) and the Group of Government Experts (GGE) on cybersecurity and welcome the renewed mandate of the OEWG on security of, and in the use of, Information and Communication Technologies 2021-2025.We look forward to advancing practical intra-BRICS cooperation in this domain, including through the implementation of the BRICS Roadmap of Practical Cooperation on ensuring Security in the Use of ICTs and the activities of the BRICS Working Group on Security in the use of ICTs, and underscore also the importance of establishing legal frameworks of cooperation among BRICS States on this matter and acknowledge the work towards consideration and elaboration of proposals, including on a BRICS intergovernmental agreement on cooperation on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and on bilateral agreements among BRICS countries.

28. We express concern over the increasing misuse of ICTs for criminal purposes and the risks and threats emanating therein.We welcome the successful conclusion of the work of theIntergovernmental Expert Group (IEG) on Cybercrime and commencement of work of the Open-Ended Ad Hoc Intergovernmental Committee of Experts to elaborate a Comprehensive International Convention on Countering the Use of ICTs for Criminal purposes under the auspices of the UN, pursuant to the UNGA Resolution 75/282. We are concerned over the increasing challenge to protect children from online sexual exploitation and from other content harmful for their health and development and look forward to strengthening BRICS cooperation to develop initiatives aimed at ensuring safety of the children on the Internet.

29. We express strong condemnation of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed. We recognize the threat emanating from terrorism, extremism conducive to terrorism and radicalization. We commit to combating terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, including the cross-border movement of terrorists,and terrorism financing networks and safe havens. We reiterate that terrorism should not be associated with any religion, nationality, civilization or ethnic group. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to contribute further to the global efforts of preventing and countering the threat of terrorism on the basis of respect for international law, in particular the Charter of the United Nations, and human rights, emphasizing that States have the primary responsibility in combating terrorism with the United Nations continuing to play central and coordinating role in this area. We also stress the need for a comprehensive and balanced approach of the whole international community to effectively curb the terrorist activities, which pose a serious threat, including in the present-day pandemic environment. We reject double standards in countering terrorism and extremism conducive to terrorism. We call for an expeditious finalization and adoption of the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism within the UN framework and for launching multilateral negotiations on an international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and biological terrorism, at the Conference of Disarmament.

30. We welcome the outcome of the Sixth BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group (CTWG) and its subgroups meetings. We endorse the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Action Plan for implementing the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Strategy which was adopted by our National Security Advisors which is aimed at implementing the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Strategy and defines the approach andactions of the BRICS countries towards counter-terrorism cooperation, including ensuring coordinated efforts to understand, identify and collaboratively respond to persistent and emerging terrorist threats, as well as cooperation within the framework of the UN and other multilateral counter-terrorism fora. This will help complement and strengthen existing bilateral and multilateral ties among the BRICS countries, and to make a meaningful contribution to the global efforts of preventing and combating the threat of terrorism including on countering radicalization, terrorism, the misuse of the internet for terrorist purposes, the travel of terrorists, and enhance measures for the protection of soft targets, intelligence sharing, and capacity building. We appreciate the Chair for holding the Seminar on the ‘Misuse of Internet for Terrorist Purposes & the Role of Digital Forensics in Terrorist Investigation’ and the Workshop on ‘Digital Forensics for BRICS countries’, and look forward to furthering cooperation in these fields.

31. We express our concern over the serious situation in illicit production and trafficking of drugs worldwide, recognizing itas a threat to public security and international and regional stability, as well as health, safety and well-being of humankind. We reiterate our commitment to the three UN Conventions on drug control as complemented by the various political commitments of UN Member States including the 2009 Political Declaration and the 2016 UNGASS outcome document and the need to preserve the international drug control mechanism.We acknowledge the importance of cooperation on drug control among BRICS countries and welcome the outcomes of the last Meeting of the BRICS Anti-Drug Working Group.

32. We reaffirm stronger cooperation and commitment to action on international anti-corruption issues, including within multilateral frameworks, subject to domestic legal systems, especially on matters related to asset recovery, denying safe havens to corrupt persons and identification of proceeds of corruption. Wewill continue to enhance anti-corruption capacity building through various education and training programs. We welcome the 2021 special session of the UN General Assembly on challenges and measures to prevent and combat corruption and strengthen international cooperation, and reiterate our commitment to implement its political declaration.

33. We reiterate our commitment to combating illicit financial flows (IFFs), money laundering and financing of terrorism and to closely cooperating within the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the FATF-style regional bodies (FSRBs), as well as other multilateral, regional and bilateral fora. We value and encourage the dialogue among BRICS countries in key issue of Anti-Money Laundering/Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) agenda.

34. We reaffirm the sole authority of the UN Security Council for imposing sanctions and stress further the imperative of refraining from any coercive measures not based on international law, in particular the UN Charter. We call for a further consolidation and strengthening of the working methods of the UN Security Council Sanctions Committees to ensure their effectiveness, responsiveness and transparency and look forward to continuing BRICS engagement on these issues.

Sustainable Development and innovative means to achieve it

35. We reaffirm our commitment to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in its three dimensions – economic, social and environmental. We note with concern that the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda and reversed years of progress on poverty, hunger, health care, education, climate change, access to clean water, and environmental protection. While the virus has impacted everyone, it is affecting the world’s poorest and most vulnerable the most. We, therefore, call upon the international community to foster global development partnerships to address the impact of the pandemic and to accelerate the implementation of 2030 Agenda by advancing the Means of Implementation, while giving special attention to the needs of developing countries.We urge donor countries to honour their Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments and to facilitate capacity building and the transfer of technology along with additional development resources to developing countries, in line with the national policy objectives of recipients.

36. We acknowledge the significant role of digital and technological means including large scale e-governance platforms, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and harnessing data for development and for increasing the effectiveness of the BRICS countries’ response to the challenges caused by the COVID 19 pandemic. We encourage wider access to these platforms and technologies for affordable access of our citizens to information and communication, which requires the seamless functioning of telecommunication/ICT systems; to take necessary measures to mitigate negative social and economic consequences thus allowing sustainable and inclusive recovery, in particular to ensure continuity in the educational process and to safeguard jobs, especially for micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In an attempt to leave no one behind, we recognize the digital divide within and across countries and therefore urge the international community to establish modalities and approaches to promote equitable and inclusive access of digital resources for all people, irrespective of where they live.

37. We recognize that the pandemic has also been instrumental in accelerating the use of digital processes across the world and has shown us that getting the data right can guide policy responses to the crisis at every step. As we enter the ‘Decade of Action’ for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), we believe that BRICS must prioritize the effective and efficientuse of technology and data for development in its various tracks of work, and encourage further cooperation. We commend the Indian Chairship for identifying the ‘Use of Digital and Technological Solutions to Achieve SDGs’ as one of its priorities for this year, and acknowledge theIndian proposal, to be further discussed by BRICS line agencies, of a BRICS Platform on Digital Public Goods, which could act as a repository for all Open-Source Technology applications created by BRICS members towards achieving SDGs for the benefit of BRICS and other developing countries. We look forward to the success of the Second United Nations Global Sustainable Transport Conference to be held in Beijing, China in October 2021.

38. The application of space technologies for peaceful purposes will be a tangible contribution to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda. In this regard, we commend the signing of the Agreement amongst BRICS Space Agencies on Cooperation on BRICS Remote Sensing Satellite Constellation, which will help enhance our capabilities in the research on global climate change, disaster management, environmental protection, prevention of food and water scarcity and sustainable socio-economic development.

39. Recognizing the importance of agriculture and rural revitalization for achieving the 2030 Agenda, we reiterate our commitment to enhancing intra-BRICS agricultural cooperation for food security and promotion of comprehensive development of ruralareas. We welcome the BRICS Agriculture Information Exchange System and the BRICS Agricultural Research Platform, as well as the adoption of the Action Plan 2021-2024 for Agricultural Cooperation of BRICS Countries.

40. We appreciate the importance of BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Cooperation in bringing together our researchers to tackle new and emerging challenges and acknowledge the progress achieved by the BRICS STI Steering Committee and joint research projects, especially on the various thematic working groups. We look forward to the early finalization of the BRICS Action Plan on Innovation Cooperationfor 2021-2024.

41. We welcome the further advancement of BRICS trade and investment cooperation and discussions about BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR) initiatives. We reaffirm the cooperation towards the establishment of the Center for Industrial Competences, welcome the initiative of a BRICS PartNIR Innovation Centre in China and BRICS PartNIRStartup events from India.

42. Recognizing that COVID 19 has fundamentally altered the delivery of education and skilling, we agree on the importance of leveraging digital solutions for ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and enhancing research and academic collaboration. We commit to strengthening our cooperation in the field of early childhood development, primary, secondary and highereducation as well as TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training), through exchanges of best practices, knowledge and expertise, and exploring the possibilities to create BRICS platforms for cooperation in this regard. We welcome the Education Ministers’ Declaration calling for cooperation in the development, distribution and access to open digital content to address the digital divide.

43. We welcome the BRICS Labour and Employment Ministers’ commitment to a human-centered recovery with inclusive labour markets and social protection system. We look forward to the outcome of the research of E-formality practices in BRICS countries by the BRICS Network of Labour Research Institutes.

44. We reiterate the importance of continued intra-BRICS dialogue in the field of disaster management and look forward to the BRICS Ministerial Meeting on Disaster Risk Management. We encourage further technical cooperation, based on the innovative people-centric, user friendly and location specific approaches, and sharing of best practices in the application of geospatial and digital technologies for developing robust multi-hazard early warning systems and advance forecasting, so as to improve disaster resilience and reduce disaster risks.

45. Stressing the importance of achieving the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development and its Goals, we reiterate our commitment to the achievement of all SDGs, including SDG-12 which identifies sustainable consumption and production patterns as a vital element of sustainable development. We agree to cooperate closely in the run up to the 2021 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference (UNFCCC COP26) in the UK and the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) COP15 in China. We stress the importance and support the adoption of a Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework that addresses the three objectives of the CBD in a balanced way.

46. We reaffirm our commitment to the full implementation of the UNFCCC, its Kyoto Protocol and Paris Agreement, and to the principles of UNFCCC including ‘Common But Differentiated Responsibilities and Respective Capabilities’ in the light of different national circumstances. We recognize that peaking of Greenhouse Gas Emissions will take longer for developing countries, in the context of sustainable development and efforts to eradicate poverty. We emphasize the need to ensure a holistic approach to climate change, focused on all dimensions including mitigation, adaptation, financing, capacity building and technology transfer along with sustainable lifestyles. We encourage further discussions and events among BRICS countries in this regard. We recall relevant Paris Agreement provisions that mandate developed countries included in its Annex II to provide the necessary means of implementation including through funding, capacity building and technology transfer to developing countries to enable implementation of their climate action in the context of sustainable development.

47. We emphasize that sustainable and efficient use of energy sources, including fossil fuel, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable energy, as well as energy efficiency and technology deployment are essential for each country’s energy transitions, building reliable energy systems and strengthening energy security. We welcome the ongoing practical cooperation within the BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform (ERCP) and take note of the BRICS Energy Technology Report 2021.

48. We welcome the last meeting of BRICS Tourism Ministers to further promote intra-BRICS cooperation in this sector. We appreciate the launch of the BRICS alliance for Green Tourism to promote measures which can shape a more resilient, sustainable and inclusive tourism sector.

49. We reiterate the need for all countries to cooperate in promoting and protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms under the principles of equality and mutual respect. We agree to continue to treat all human rights, including the right to development, in a fair and equal manner, on the same footing and with the same emphasis. We agree to strengthen cooperation on issues of common interests both within BRICS and in multilateral fora including the United Nations Human Rights Council, taking into account the necessity to promote, protect and fulfil human rights in a non-selective, non-politicized and constructive manner, and without double standards.

Economic and Financial Cooperation for Sustainable Development

50. We welcome the progress made under the pillar of economic and financial cooperation towards enhancing our capacity in meeting our Sustainable Development Goals, especially in light of the challenges posed by the pandemic. In this regard, we stress the importance of continued implementation of the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2025 in all relevant Ministerial tracks and Working Groups.

51. We recognize that the macroeconomic stability of the BRICS economies will play a major role in achieving global recovery and stability. We endorse the BRICS Statement on Global Economic Outlook and Responding to COVID-19 Crisis adopted by our Finance Ministers and Central Banks Governors.As we continue our efforts to strengthen our cooperation towards achieving strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive economic growth in a post-pandemic world, we welcome the sharing of policy experience by BRICS countries on their domestic economic responses to the pandemic.

52. We appreciate the outcomes of the Meeting of BRICS Heads of Customs Administrations, and encourage BRICS Customs to further cooperate in such areas as joint enforcement network, capacity building and administrative assistance. We welcome the finalization of the BRICS Agreement on Cooperation and Mutual Administrative Assistance in Customs Matters, and support that a Customs training workshop be held in the BRICS Customs Training Centre in India and joint BRICS Customs enforcement operationsbe organized in mutually agreed areas.

53. We recognize the importance of strengthening infrastructure and information-sharing to better identify investment opportunities, leverage private sector investments and meet infrastructure investment needs of BRICS countries. In this regard, we welcome the ‘Technical Report on Social Infrastructure Financing and Use of Digital Technologies’ prepared by the BRICS Taskforce on PPP and Infrastructure as a collaborative effort to share knowledge. We look forward to resuming technical engagements with the NDB and the BRICS Task Force on PPP and Infrastructure on the Integrated Digital Platform on infrastructure investment projects and call for intensification of work in this area.

54. We welcome the outcomes of the Trade Ministers’ meeting, its Joint Communique and endorse the Statement on Cooperation on the Multilateral Trading System, Framework for Cooperation in Trade in Professional Services, Framework for Ensuring Consumer Protection in E-Commerce, and the Declaration on Cooperation for Protection of Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions. We welcome the adoption of the Implementation Roadmap on Trade and Investment aspects of the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2025. We stress the need to continue our joint efforts on facilitating a conducive environment for enhancing trade, specifically value-added trade, among BRICS countries while striving to address the pandemic and its consequences.

55. We welcome the outcomes of the MSME Roundtable, which has helped enhance our cooperation in the area of development of MSMEs to integrate them to global value chains. We also welcome the work being carried out by our Finance Ministries and Central Banks on the preparation of a survey on Fintech applications in MSMEs and a Report on ‘Digital Financial Inclusion’ respectively.

56. We appreciate the NDB’s substantive progress in membership expansion despite challenges emanating from the COVID-19 pandemic. We reiterate that the process of expansion should be gradual and balanced in terms of geographic representation in its membership as well as supportive of the NDB's goals of attaining the highest possible credit rating and institutional development. We note with satisfaction the discussions held at the Annual meeting of the Board of Governors of the New Development Bank and look forward to the Bank’s second General Strategy for 2022-26. We recognize the role of New Development Bank as vital to addressing health and economic consequences of the pandemic and encourage the NDB to explore the possibility of financing more social infrastructure projects, including those that use digital technologies. We also urge the Bank to enhance its role in mobilizing and catalyzing private capital as well as undertake more co-financing ventures with other Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) and Development Financial Institutions (DFIs). We look forward to the Bank’s relocation to its permanent headquarters in Shanghai and the opening of NDB’s regional office in India in 2021.

57. We acknowledge the importance of strengthening the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) mechanism. Furthermore, we welcome the successful completion of the fourth CRAtest runand support the work to improve the framework for coordination between the CRA and the IMF.

58. We welcome the first collaborative study of our central banks on impact of COVID-19 on Balance of Payments of BRICS countries and the publication of the BRICS Economic Bulletin 2021 as part of our efforts to enhance CRA’s analytical and research capacity.

59. We acknowledge the fruitful cooperation under the BRICS Payments Task Force (BPTF) through dialogues and discussion. We take note of the progress achieved in the ‘BRICS Local Currency Bond Fund’ initiative and look forward to its operation.

60. We commend the ‘e-Booklet of Information Security Regulations in Finance’ and the ‘Compendium on BRICS Best Practices in Information Security Risks: Supervision and Control’ as comprehensive documents of regulations and best practices under the BRICS Rapid Information Security Channel (BRISC).

61. We welcome the continuing work of Inter-Bank Cooperation Mechanism (IMC) to implement the Memorandum of BRICS DFIs Principles for Responsible Financing.


62. Recognizing the important role of fair competition in supporting business development, protecting consumers’ interests, and promoting post-pandemic economic recovery and growth in difficult times, we will continue to deepen practical cooperation in the field of competition. We support the BRICS International Competition Conference to be held in China in November 2021 and in India in 2023.

63. We highlight the need to continue advancing the implementation of the Working Mechanism on Technical Regulations, Standards, Metrology andConformity Assessment procedures for cooperation to facilitate trade among the BRICS countries.

64. We reaffirm the importance of BRICS people-to-people exchanges in enhancing mutual understanding, friendship and cooperation amongst our nations and people. We note with satisfaction, in this regard, the progress made under this pillar under India’s Chairship in 2021, including in the fields of governance, culture, education, sports, arts, films, media, youth and academic exchanges, and looked forward to further cooperation in these areas.

65. We support further cooperation between business associations of BRICS Countries. We welcome the successful meetings of the BRICS Business Forum, the BRICS Business Council and the BRICS Women’s Business Alliance, and appreciate their efforts in strengthening business ties and promoting trade and investment relations amongst our countries.

66. We welcome the launch of the ‘BRICS Solutions for SDGs Awards 2021’ by the BRICS Business Council in recognition of the work being done in BRICS countries towards achieving SDGs through innovative solutions. We recognize that these awards will help in the exchange of knowledge and best practices in the area of SDGs. We also appreciate the BRICS Business Council for optimally leveraging digital technologies to organise a virtual trade fair which brought together business houses, entrepreneurs and other relevant players on a common digital platform to provide a thrust to intra-BRICS economic engagement.

67. We commend the progress of BRICS countries in tackling new challenges in urban areas and note the contribution of the BRICS Smart Cities Workshop, Urbanisation Forum, and Friendship cities & Local Government Cooperation Forum towards these efforts.

68. We commend the progress in cultural cooperation and acknowledge its role in enhancing understanding between our people. We welcome the outcomes of the last meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Culture and look forward to further exchanges in this field.

69. We welcome the organization of the curtain raiser for the BRICS Film Festival. We note with satisfaction that BRICS members will be ‘Focus Countries’ at the upcoming International Film Festival of India in November 2021.

70. We recognize that continuity in youth exchanges in different spheres, including in such areas as science, education, arts and culture, innovation, energy, diplomacy, volunteerism and entrepreneurship, would ensure a bright future for intra-BRICS cooperation and appreciate India’s efforts to host the BRICS Youth Summit despite the pandemic.

71. We look forward to the upcoming BRICS Sports Ministers Meeting in 2021 and encourage intra-BRICS cooperation in field of Physical Culture and Sports.We express oursupport to China to host Beijing 2022 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

72. We commend the outcomes of the Meetings of the BRICS Think Tank Council (BTTC) and BRICS Academic Forum, acknowledging the progress made towards strengthening the dialogue and exchanges between our academic communities so as to promote future-oriented research, policy analysis and knowledge-sharing. We welcome the outcomes of the BRICS Civil Forum and take note of its recommendations.

73. China, South Africa, Brazil and Russia commend India’s BRICS Chairship in 2021 and express their gratitude to the government and people of India for holding the XIII BRICS Summit.

74. Brazil, Russia, India and South Africa extend full support to China for its BRICS Chairship in 2022 and the holding of the XIV BRICS Summit.


XII BRICS Summit Moscow Declaration

Moscow, Russia, 17 November 2020

Preamble

1. We, the Leaders of the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Russian Federation, the Republic of India, the People's Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa held the XII BRICS Summit under the theme «BRICS Partnership for Global Stability, Shared Security and Innovative Growth» on 17 November 2020. 

2. We commend with satisfaction that in 2020 under the Russian Chairmanship, despite the backdrop of current adverse global challenges, BRICS maintained the momentum and continuity of its activities, aimed to produce concrete results for the benefit of citizens. We acknowledge the determined efforts of the Russian Federation to ensure the advancement of the BRICS strategic partnership in the three pillars of policy and security, economy and finance, culture and people-to-people exchanges and note the outcomes of over one hundred events held in-person and via videoconferencing (Annex II) that fostered further progress in our mutually beneficial and pragmatic cooperation (Annex I). 

United for a Better World

3. We recall that 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations and the 75th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. In this regard, we will always remember the many contributions made by all BRICS countries, including loss of lives of soldiers and civilians. We reinforce our commitment to a world of peace, stability and prosperity, mutual respect and equality, and to upholding international law, including the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations as its indispensable cornerstone, and to the central role of the United Nations in an international system in which sovereign States cooperate to maintain peace and security, advance sustainable development, ensure the promotion and protection of democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms for all with the aim to build a brighter shared future for the international community based on mutually beneficial cooperation. 

4. We recognize the Victory in the Second World War as our common legacy and pay tribute to all those who fought against fascism, tyranny and militarism, colonialism and for liberation of the colonized, for freedom of nations, and stress the importance of preservation and inadmissibility of desecration or destruction of monuments erected in their remembrance. We recall that, born out of the horrors of the Second World War, the United Nations, as a common endeavor for humanity, was established to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war and since then has helped to shape the very structure of relations between nations in the modern age. We further urge for a resolute stand against the rehabilitation of Nazi ideology, racism, xenophobia, colonialism and the distortion of history.

5. We call the international community to celebrate the seventy-fifth anniversary of the United Nations by enhanced efforts to establish a more fair, just, inclusive, equitable and representative multipolar international system, based on sovereign equality of all States, respect for their territorial integrity and mutual respect for interests and concerns of all. We reaffirm the principles of non-intervention in the internal affairs of States and the resolution of international disputes by peaceful means and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law as well as the inadmissibility of the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the Purposes and Principles of the United Nations. We stress further the imperative of refraining from any coercive measures not based on international law and the UN Charter.

6. We reaffirm our commitment to multilateralism and the principles of mutual respect, sovereign equality, democracy, inclusiveness, and strengthened collaboration. We will continue working towards strengthening and reforming international governance so that it is more inclusive, representative, democratic with meaningful and greater participation of developing countries in international decision-making and better attuned to the contemporary realities. We acknowledge that current interconnected international challenges should be addressed by strengthened international cooperation in the interest of both nations and peoples through reinvigorated and reformed multilateral system, including the UN, the WTO, the WHO, the IMF and other international organizations. We underline, in this regard, the imperative that international organizations be fully driven by Member States and promote the interest of all. 

7. We congratulate India on its election as a member of the UN Security Council for the term 2021-2022 and commend South Africa for its contribution as a UN Security Council member in 2019-2020. We also recognize the candidacy of Brazil as a UNSC member for the biennium 2022-2023. It will be an opportunity to enhance further BRICS countries dialogue on issues on the UN Security Council agenda and for continued cooperation of BRICS countries in areas of mutual interest, including through regular exchanges amongst their Permanent Missions to the United Nations and in other international fora. 

8. We recognize the UNGA resolution 75/1 adopted on 21 September 2020 and reiterate the call for reforms of the principal organs of the United Nations. We commit to instill new life into discussions on reform of the UN Security Council and continue the work to revitalize the General Assembly and strengthen the Economic and Social Council. 

9. We recall the 2005 World Summit Outcome document and reaffirm the need for a comprehensive reform of the UN, including its Security Council, with a view to making it more representative, effective and efficient, and to increase the representation of the developing countries so that it can adequately respond to global challenges.

10. We reiterate the imperative of strengthening international cooperation with a view to increasing individual and shared capacities to jointly address emerging world-wide threats, including the COVID-19 pandemic and its adverse impacts, in an efficient, pragmatic, coordinated and prompt manner. We stress the value of cooperation among States needed to urgently restore international trust, economic growth and trade, strengthen markets stability and resilience, preserve jobs and income, in particular for the most vulnerable groups of society. 

11. We express our solidarity with all people and countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences along with our deepest condolences and sympathy to the families of the victims of the pandemic and all those whose lives and livelihoods have been affected. We also extend our sincere gratitude to all health workers, doctors, nurses and personnel of infectious and other hospitals, polyclinics, dispensaries, ambulances, researchers, who do their professional duty in dangerous and difficult conditions and, risking their health, help other people. 

12. We recognize the role of extensive immunization against COVID-19 in preventing, containing and stopping transmission in order to bring the pandemic to an end, once safe, quality, efficacious, effective, accessible and affordable vaccines are available. We acknowledge initiatives by the WHO, governments, non-profit organisations, research institutes and the pharmaceutical industry to expedite the research, development and production of the COVID-19 vaccine and therapeutics, and support cooperative approaches in this regard. We will work to ensure that, when available, it is disseminated in a fair, equitable and affordable basis. In this regard we support the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) initiative. 

Policy and Security

13. We note that despite COVID-19 pandemic limitations intense BRICS dialogue has continued on topical policy, peace and security issues in relevant intra-BRICS mechanisms. We welcome the Stand-alone Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations on 4 September 2020, in the course of which they exchanged views on major international and regional issues, as well as on ways to strengthen BRICS cooperation and on possibilities for mutual support of initiatives and closer cooperation at the 75th session of the UN General Assembly. We also welcome the Extraordinary Video conference of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations on 28 April 2020. 

14. We welcome the X Meeting of BRICS High Representatives for Security, held on 17 September 2020, and commend them for enriching the BRICS dialogue on counter-terrorism, security in the use of ICTs, major international and regional hot spots, peacekeeping and transnational organized crime.

15. We reaffirm our commitment to collective efforts for peaceful settlement of disputes through political and diplomatic means. We note the UN Secretary-General’s initiative for a global ceasefire and, in this context, recall the UNSC Resolution 2532(2020) demanding a general and immediate cessation of hostilities in all situations on its agenda with the exception of military operations against terrorist groups, designated as such by the UN Security Council, and calling for durable humanitarian pause against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

16. We express our support for urgent political and diplomatic efforts to maintain and strengthen international peace and security. We regret disruptions of strategic stability mechanisms and arms control regimes and commit to uphold them. We underscore the fundamental importance of the 2010 Russia-US Treaty on Measures for the Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms for the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime, and we call on the parties to agree on its extension without delay.

17. We emphasize the fundamental importance of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) as a pillar of the international WMD disarmament and control regime. We underline the need to comply with and strengthen the BTWC, including by adopting a legally binding Protocol to the Convention that provides for, inter alia, an efficient verification mechanism. We support prompt resumption of the negotiations on such a Protocol. The BTWC functions, including in what concerns the UN Security Council, should not be duplicated by other mechanisms. Efforts aimed at the resolution of implementation issues should be consistent with the BTWC. 

18. We reaffirm support for the preservation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) as an effective disarmament and non-proliferation instrument and call upon the States Parties to uphold the integrity of the CWC and engage in a constructive dialogue with a view to restoring the spirit of consensus in the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). 

19. We underline the importance of ensuring safety and security of outer space activities and use of outer space for peaceful purposes as well as to prevent an arms race in outer space. We emphasize the urgent need to negotiate a legally binding multilateral instrument that could fill the gap in the international legal regime applicable to outer space, including on the prevention of the placement of weapons in outer space and the threat or use of force against outer space objects. We stress that practical Transparency and Confidence-Building Measures (TCBMs), including such as the “No First Placement” initiative, may also contribute towards this goal. We reaffirm that TCBMs should complement, but not substitute for, effective legally binding regime for outer space. 

20. We reiterate the importance of the strict adherence to the principles established in the Outer Space Treaty in order to contribute to the sustainable and peaceful use of outer space for the benefit and in the interests of all countries. We reaffirm the need to carry on activities in the peaceful exploration and uses of outer space in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, to preserve outer space for future generations. The application of relevant space technologies for peaceful purposes will be a tangible contribution to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. We underscore the importance of further BRICS cooperation in the area of remote sensing satellites.

21. We emphasize the need to ensure the long-term sustainability of outer space activities, including in the context of the safety of space operations. We welcome, in this respect, the adoption by the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) at its 62nd session of the report with 21 guidelines for the long-term sustainability of outer space activities, and we commit to contribute to the Working Group established to address this issue and operationalisation of its agreed structure and work programme. 

22. We express grave concern at the rise of violence and continuing armed conflicts in different parts of the world that have significant impact at both the regional and international levels. We concur that all conflicts should be resolved by peaceful means and diplomatic engagement through political dialogue and negotiations in line with international law, particularly the UN Charter. 

23. We reaffirm strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of the Syrian Arab Republic. We are convinced that there can be no military solution to the Syrian conflict. We also reaffirm our commitment to advancing a Syrian-led and Syrian-owned, UN-facilitated political process in line with the UNSC Resolution 2254, culminating in constitutional reform and free and fair elections. We emphasize in this context the importance of the Constitutional Committee in Geneva launched with the decisive participation of the countries-guarantors of the Astana Process and all states engaged in efforts to address the conflict through political means and welcome the efforts of the Special Envoy of the UN Secretary General for Syria to ensure the sustainability and effectiveness of the Committee. We express our conviction that, in order to reach general agreement, members of the Constitutional Committee should be guided by the commitment to compromise and cooperate constructively without foreign interference. We welcome the signing of the Additional Protocol to the Memorandum on Stabilization of the Situation in the Idlib De-Escalation Area. We reaffirm the international obligations to fight terrorism in all its forms and highlight the importance of unity in the fight against terrorist organizations in Syria as designated by the UN Security Council. We emphasize the fundamental importance of allowing unhindered humanitarian aid in accordance with the UN humanitarian principles and the post-conflict reconstruction of Syria that would create conditions for the safe, voluntary and dignified return of Syrian refugees and internally displaced persons to their places of permanent residence thus contributing to achieving long-term stability and security in Syria and the region in general. We are also concerned about all those in vulnerable situations and condemn persecution on ethnic or religious grounds. 

24. We are convinced that failure to resolve the Palestinian-Israeli conflict continues to hamper peace and stability in the Middle East. We remain committed to a just and lasting peace in the region, stating that a two-state solution must be sought, guided by the international legal framework previously in place, such as the relevant UN resolutions and the Arab Peace Initiative, resulting in the creation of an independent and viable State of Palestine, existing peacefully side by side with its neighbours. We express the need for new and creative diplomatic efforts to achieving a just, lasting and comprehensive settlement and emphasize the importance of an early launch of direct negotiations between the Palestinian and the Israeli sides.

25. We express our solidarity with the people of Lebanon in connection with the massive explosion in the port of Beirut on 4 August 2020, which resulted in considerable casualties and large-scale destruction. We call upon all members of the international community to provide assistance to Lebanon with the purpose of overcoming the consequences of the catastrophe and the speedy normalization of the political and socio-economic situation in the country. We emphasize that, taking into consideration the legitimate aspirations of the Lebanese people for political solutions to the current challenges faced by the nation, Lebanese political forces should be able to work together in the current complicated conditions and take decisive steps for the sake of de-escalation of tensions, renunciation of violence and prevention of the situation sliding out of control. 

26. We reaffirm our continued support for efforts by the Iraqi Government towards national reconstruction, development and a mutually respectful and inclusive national dialogue. Stressing the need to unconditionally respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq and the inadmissibility of any interference in its internal affairs, we emphasize the importance of supporting the Iraqi people in their fight against manifestations of extremism and terrorism and promoting economic recovery of the country. We further acknowledge the importance of stability in Iraq for regional and international security, condemn in the strongest possible terms the heinous and inhuman violence perpetrated by terrorist and extremist groups, such as the self-styled ISIS, in the territory of Iraq. 

27. We reaffirm our grave concern over the humanitarian crisis and the ongoing conflict in the Republic of Yemen that has a significant impact on security and stability of the whole region. We recall the need for a full cessation of hostilities in the country and establishment of an inclusive negotiation process mediated by the UN and reaffirm that progress cannot be achieved without a constructive dialogue with due account of the legitimate interests of different political forces of the country. Without sustainable peace in Yemen the humanitarian crisis will only continue to worsen and we emphasize further the importance of providing urgent humanitarian assistance to Yemenis and facilitating the rapid, safe and unhindered access of humanitarian supplies to all people and across all regions of the country.

28. We express our serious concern over the ongoing tensions, including one-sided actions, in the Gulf region. We reaffirm the support of the BRICS countries for the efforts to resolve the existing disagreements through negotiations and diplomatic engagement, stress the need for promoting a positive and constructive agenda in the region, in which all countries jointly respond to common threats and challenges. 

29. We call for the establishment of long-term peace in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and reaffirm our unwavering support to the people of Afghanistan in its efforts toward building a stable, inclusive, peaceful, independent and prosperous sovereign State. We welcome the launch of intra-Afghan negotiations and will continue to support the Afghan-led and Afghan-owned peace process. We condemn in the strongest terms the terrorist attacks in Afghanistan and express concern over the unstable security environment.

30. We welcome the agreement reached by the Leaders of Azerbaijan and Armenia on a complete ceasefire since 10 November 2020 in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict zone and support further political and diplomatic efforts to create the necessary conditions for a lasting and comprehensive peace in the region.

31. We express our support for continuing the diplomatic negotiations in bilateral and multilateral formats to resolve all issues pertaining to the Korean Peninsula, including its complete denuclearization, and maintain peace and stability in North East Asia. We reaffirm the commitment to a comprehensive peaceful, diplomatic and political solution to the situation. 

32. We call for international support for regional and subregional initiatives aimed at strengthening peace and security on the continent based on the principle «African solutions to African problems» as articulated by Africans themselves. We commend the African Union’s commitment to promote the «Silencing the Guns by 2020» initiative and underscore the importance of an enhanced partnership between the United Nations and the African Union in the area of international peace and security.

33. We express our support for the African Union Agenda 2063 and the efforts towards intensified integration and development in the continent, including through implementing the Agreement on the African Continental Free Trade Area. We note the progress achieved by the AU in addressing infrastructure gaps, in particular, within the framework of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), and the importance of promoting investments with a view to supporting industrial development, creating jobs, ensuring food security, fighting poverty and providing for Africa’s sustainable development. We reaffirm our readiness to develop further cooperation with the African continent, including with the aim to strengthening its potential to address the intertwined health, economic, and social effects of COVID-19.

34. Reaffirming our strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity and national unity of Libya, we call on the Libyan parties to the conflict to show mutual restraint and stress the importance of establishing a long-term lasting ceasefire in Libya, in order to ensure a comprehensive and sustainable solution through a Libyan-led and Libyan-owned political process under the auspices of the United Nations. We welcome the announcement of the resumption of inclusive intra-Libyan talks under the framework of the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum. We reiterate the need to fully implement the decisions of the International Conference on Libya held in Berlin on 19 January 2020 and the UNSC Resolution 2510, noting the importance of parallel progress on all three tracks of the intra-Libyan negotiation process (military, political and economic) with substantial assistance from the United Nations. Encouraging the UN Secretary General to promptly designate a Special Representative for Libya, we note the significant role played by the African Union and the League of Arab States in promoting a peaceful intra-Libyan dialogue and political process. 

35. We support the steps taken by the Sudanese leadership to strengthen national accord and overcome social and economic crisis in the country. We commend the commitment of the Sudanese government to the nationwide effort to bring an end to internal armed conflicts, primarily in Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile. We welcome the signing of the Juba peace agreement between the Sudanese government and the armed opposition movements on 3 October 2020 and encourage the signatories to swiftly implement the main provisions of the agreement.

36. We express concern over the situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo and condemn attacks against civilians and UN peacekeepers. We call for tangible progress in promoting peace in the country within the existing legal framework and creating conditions for refugees and internally displaced persons to return to their homes.

37. We reiterate our strong condemnation of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed, and that it should not be associated with any religion, nationality, civilization or ethnic group. We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to contribute further to the global efforts of preventing and countering the threat of terrorism on the basis of respect for international law and the Charter of the United Nations, emphasizing that States have the primary responsibility in combating terrorism with the United Nations continuing to play central and coordinating role in this area. We also stress the need for a comprehensive and balanced approach of the whole international community to effectively curb the terrorist activities, which pose a serious threat, including in the present-day pandemic environment. To address the threat of chemical and biological terrorism, we emphasize the need to launch multilateral negotiations on an international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and biological terrorism, at the Conference on Disarmament. We also call for an expeditious conclusion and adoption of the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism within the UN framework.

38. We welcome the outcomes of the V BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group (CTWG) and its subgroups’ inaugural meetings, which have further advanced BRICS cooperation in the areas of countering terrorism and its financing, foreign terrorist fighters, radicalization, the use of the Internet for terrorism purposes and capacity building. We endorse the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Strategy aimed at complementing and strengthening cooperation among the BRICS countries as well as making a meaningful contribution to the global efforts of preventing and combating the threat of terrorism. We designate the BRICS High Representatives for Security to lead the review of the implementation of the Strategy and in this regard of the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group (CTWG) work including the development of Counter-Terrorism Action Plan.

39. We emphasize the need of a comprehensive and balanced approach to ICTs development and security, including technical advancement, business development, of safeguarding the security of States and public interests, and of respecting the right to privacy of individuals. We underscore the leading role of the United Nations in promoting dialogue to forge common understandings on the security of and in the use of ICTs and development of universally agreed norms, rules and principles for responsible behavior of States in the realm of ICTs, without prejudice to other relevant international fora. We emphasize the importance of international law and principles applicable in this sphere. In this regard, we welcome the work of the UN Open-Ended Working Group as well as of the Group of Governmental Experts and note progress in the discussions. 

40. We also underscore the importance of establishing legal frameworks of cooperation among BRICS States on ensuring security in the use of ICTs. We note the activities of the BRICS Working Group on Security in the Use of ICTs and acknowledge the work towards consideration and elaboration of proposals on this matter, including on a BRICS intergovernmental agreement on cooperation on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and on bilateral agreements among BRICS countries. We reaffirm the importance of advancing the intra-BRICS cooperation, including through the consideration of relevant initiatives and the implementation of the BRICS Roadmap of Practical Cooperation on Ensuring Security in the Use of ICTs.

41. While emphasizing the formidable potential of the digital revolution for growth and development, we recognize new associated possibilities it brings for criminal activities and threats. We express concern over the rising level and complexity of criminal misuse of ICTs as well as the absence of a multilateral framework to counter the use of ICTs for criminal purposes. We recognize also that new challenges and threats in this respect require international cooperation and discussions on possible legal frameworks, including the need to elaborate a comprehensive international convention on countering the use of ICTs for criminal purposes under the auspices of the UN and note the establishment of an open-ended ad hoc intergovernmental committee of experts under the auspices of the UN in accordance with UNGA Resolution 74/247 of 27 December 2019. 

42. We are concerned over the increasing challenge to protect children from online sexual exploitation and from other content harmful for their health and development and look forward to strengthening BRICS cooperation to develop initiatives aimed at ensuring safety of the children on the Internet.

43. We express our concern over the scale of the illicit drug trafficking worldwide that poses a threat to public security and international and regional stability. We emphasize our commitment to the three UN Conventions on drug control and the need to preserve the international drug control mechanism. We acknowledge the importance of cooperation on drug control among BRICS countries and note the IV Meeting of the BRICS Anti-Drug Working Group held on 12 August 2020.

44. We reaffirm our commitment to promote international anti-corruption cooperation, particularly, in light of the 2021 Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly against corruption, strengthen BRICS collaboration, including within multilateral frameworks, subject to domestic legal systems, on all issues related to anti-corruption law enforcement, including on matters related to asset recovery and denying safe haven to corrupt persons and proceeds of corruption. We welcome the 2021 UNGASS and will work to promote UNCAC as an important channel for international anti-corruption cooperation. We encourage the BRICS Anti-Corruption Working Group to continue its work in this regard.

45. We reiterate our commitment to combating illicit financial flows (IFFs), money laundering and financing of terrorism and to closely cooperating within the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the FATF-style regional bodies (FSRBs), as well as other multilateral, regional and bilateral fora. We value and encourage the dialogue among BRICS countries on key issues of the Anti-Money Laundering/Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT).

Economy and Finances, Intergovernmental Cooperation

46. We recognize complexity and interconnectedness of the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and its adverse impact on the international economy, healthcare systems, financial sector and development, well-being of the most vulnerable groups in our societies. In this regard, we reaffirm our commitment to contribute, in coordination with broader international community, to healthcare and economic recovery. Given the BRICS share in the global economy and trade, we commit to lead in reinvigorating multilateral cooperation and consolidating international efforts, aimed at elaborating common, efficient and sustainable solutions to tackling the current crisis and ensuring economic growth.

47. We will strengthen our efforts as necessary to promptly navigate the BRICS countries towards strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive economic development and growth in the post-COVID-19 era and acknowledge substantial fiscal, monetary and financial stability measures implemented in our countries in order to support economic growth, and reaffirm our determination to continue using available policy tools to safeguard people’s lives and livelihoods. 

48. We attach great importance to the information exchange on the nationally adopted measures as well as short-term and mid-term stimulus packages aimed at effectively mitigating the consequences of the current crisis and full implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Policy priorities in our countries go beyond the immediate objectives to minimise the COVID-19 implications and include, inter alia, deepening international cooperation and trade, developing appropriate supply chains for industrial and agricultural goods and minimising disruptions to them, strengthening the social safety nets and healthcare systems, increasing public and private investments, promoting strong and sustainable macroeconomic policies, fostering resilience of the economies, maintaining financial stability and conducting important structural reforms to ensure that all three pillars of the Sustainable Development Agenda – economic, social and environmental – are pursued so that no one is left behind and those furthest behind are helped first. We acknowledge the need to strengthen cooperation on complex issues of the BRICS post-pandemic economic agenda.

49. We reiterate the importance of open, stable and secure global markets and acknowledge the building of more resilient global supply chains for increased production of critical health, food and other industrial and agricultural products at the national level and in our respective regional contexts, consistent with WTO rules. We call on all WTO members to ensure that all COVID-19 related measures are targeted, proportionate, transparent and temporary and do not create unnecessary barriers to trade or disruption to global supply chains, and are consistent with WTO rules. We welcome strengthening international cooperation in all these sectors. We will continue to explore concrete ways to facilitate the movement of people in a way that does not impede our efforts to protect public health.

50. Valuing the continued role of the G20 as the premier forum for international economic cooperation and coordinated action to overcome the current global challenges, we commit to continue coordination and collaborative efforts within the G20 on issues of mutual interest to the BRICS countries and with the aim to advance in the G20 the interests and priorities of emerging market economies and developing countries, including the updating of the G20 Action Plan. 

51. We reaffirm our commitment to a strong, quota-based and adequately resourced IMF at the center of the global financial safety net. We welcome the actions taken by the IMF in response to the crisis resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak. The IMF emergency financing, together with the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (PRGT) and the Catastrophe Containment and Relief Trust (CCRT) debt flow relief for the poorest countries, have helped the affected IMF Members address urgent balance of payments needs and mitigate the adverse health and economic impact. We call on the IMF to explore additional tools that could serve its Members' needs as the crisis evolves, drawing on relevant experiences from previous crises. Given the substantial demand for IMF financing, we keep demand on IMF resources under close review. Therefore, we look forward to expeditious actions on completing the 16th General Review of Quotas within the agreed time frame and implementing the long overdue governance reforms in the IMF.

52. We welcome the international efforts to provide support for low-income countries, including through the Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI) and its extension by 6 months. We encourage the MDBs, including the World Bank, to go further on their collective efforts in supporting the DSSI. We strongly encourage private creditors to participate in the DSSI on comparable terms when requested by eligible countries. Furthermore, we call for more attention on the risks of downgrades by Credit Rating Agencies, which affect market access and impact sovereign decisions to request debt suspension.

53. We acknowledge the crucial role of international trade in economic recovery and remain fully committed to a transparent, open, inclusive, non-discriminatory and rules-based multilateral trading system, as embodied in the World Trade Organization. It is critical that all WTO Members avoid unilateral and protectionist measures, that run counter to the spirit and rules of the WTO. 

54. We support the necessary reform of the WTO with a view to making it more resilient and effective in confronting global economic challenges and to improve its key functions in the interest of all WTO Members. The reform must, inter alia, preserve the centrality, core values and fundamental principles of the WTO, and consider the interests of all members, including developing countries and LDC, recognizing that the majority of WTO members are developing countries. We urge all WTO Members to engage constructively in addressing the need for expeditious restoration of the full-strength Appellate Body. We acknowledge, in this regard, the Joint Statement by BRICS Trade Ministers on Multilateral Trading System and the WTO Reform.

55. We note the progress in the implementation of the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2020 and underline its role in expanding our cooperation. We welcome the adoption of the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership for the period 2021-2025 as a key guideline for enhancing BRICS cooperation in trade, investment and finance, digital economy and sustainable development, to facilitate the speedy economic recovery and increase living standards in the BRICS countries. We will also continue implementing, as appropriate, the BRICS Action Agenda on Economic and Trade Cooperation to guide our economic and trade cooperation. 

56. We welcome the adoption of the BRICS Understanding on Investment Facilitation, which emphasized upon the voluntary actions for enhancement of transparency, improvement of efficiency and promotion of cooperation by BRICS countries as a way forward to promotion of investment for sustainable development. We also take note of the improvement of business environment for MSMEs. In this regard we welcome the adoption of the Guidelines for Promoting Effective Participation of MSMEs in International Trade that promotes MSMEs integration in global value chains and their operation performance. We recognize that appropriate instruments aimed at creating the favorable environment for investments at the domestic, intra-BRICS and international levels may promote international trade, sustainable development and inclusive growth.

57. We recognize the importance of strengthening infrastructure data-sharing to better identify investment opportunities, leverage private sector investments and meet the infrastructure investment needs of BRICS countries. In this regard, we acknowledge the initiative on exploring sharing relevant and already existing national data on infrastructure investment projects into a common Data Room on a voluntary basis. We take note of the progress made by the BRICS Taskforce on PPP and Infrastructure and look forward to further cooperation among BRICS countries and to possible modalities of NDB’s engagement in this initiative.

58. We commend the NDB for providing financial resources to reduce human, social and economic losses caused by the coronavirus outbreak and to restore economic growth in the BRICS countries. We underscore timely measures taken by the NDB in order to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences embodied in the Emergency Assistance Program aimed to provide up to USD 10 billion for Emergency Loans to its member countries.

59. We commend the NDB’s remarkable achievements made in the last 5 years and express our appreciation to the first President of the NDB Mr. Kundapur Vaman Kamath for his strong leadership in this institution during his tenure. We welcome Mr. Marcos Troyjo as the new President of the NDB and look forward to the Bank continuing its institutional development under his leadership. We welcome the opening of the NDB Eurasian Regional Center in Moscow – the third NDB regional office – and look forward to opening the NDB regional office in India next year.

60. We support the NDB membership expansion process based on relevant decisions by the NDB Board of Governors. This will strengthen the NDB’s role as a global development finance institution and further contribute to the mobilization of resources for infrastructure and sustainable development projects in Bank’s member states. The process of expansion should be gradual and balanced in terms of geographic representation in its membership as well as supportive of the NDB’s goals of attaining the highest possible credit rating and institutional development. We welcome the launch of the formal negotiations with potential candidates based on these principles and work towards the timely expansion of NDB’s membership.

61. We acknowledge the progress made in effecting the amendments to update the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) documents and the efforts of the BRICS countries’ central banks in augmenting the analytical support to the CRA. We welcome the BRICS Economic Bulletin as an annual analytical document to support CRA. We welcome the successful conclusion of the third test run with advance payment as the added element of complexity.

62. We commend continuing work on the national payments systems’ cooperation, in particular, the creation of the BRICS Payments Task Force (BPTF) and look forward to further progress on this track. 

63. We welcome the establishment of the BRICS Rapid Information Security Channel (BRISC) to allow the BRICS countries’ central banks to exchange information on cyber threats and share experience in countering cyber attacks in the financial sphere.

64. We note the progress achieved in establishing a BRICS Local Currency Bond Fund and look forward to its operation.

65. We reiterate the need to promote industrial growth and welcome further advancement of our trade and investment cooperation, including within the framework of the BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR). We encourage mutually beneficial cooperation among BRICS countries and UNIDO on assessing the establishment of a Centre for Industrial Competences through follow up discussions as appropriate, and note China’s initiative to establish a BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution Innovation Center.

66. We recognize the role of the digital economy as an important tool for modernization and transformation of the industry, promotion of inclusive economic growth, support of seamless global trade and business conduct, and thus helping BRICS national economies to meet the Sustainable Development Goals. At the same time we acknowledge the challenges arising from the unprecedented growth of digital technologies and e-commerce, and emphasize the need for a dedicated focus on overcoming the digital divide and to support developing countries to address its socio-economic implications. In the context of accelerated development of the e-commerce sector and increased volume of online-transactions worldwide, we will enhance our cooperation through the BRICS E-commerce Working Group. We recognize the potential for establishing a workstream to examine the experience of BRICS and other countries, as well as international associations in the field of consumer protection in e-commerce and create a basis for exploring the development of a practical framework for ensuring consumer protection in the BRICS countries, including through pilot projects and initiatives.

67. We reiterate our willingness to further deepen international cooperation in the field of energy on the basis of equality, non-discrimination and full respect for sovereignty and national interests, noting the pivotal role of energy in promoting sustainable development. Ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all remains the priority of international energy policy and we intend to enhance cooperation to combat energy poverty. We emphasize that sustainable and efficient use of all energy sources, energy efficiency and technology deployment are essential for each country’s energy transitions, and for building reliable energy systems and strengthening energy security. We emphasize the importance of BRICS countries greater contribution to the global energy agenda in line with their share in the world energy production and consumption. 

68. We will enhance strategic partnership in energy by fostering trade in energy related goods, promoting technological cooperation, facilitating mutual investments, exchanging views on regulations and energy policies. We welcome the informal consultations among BRICS states on topical energy issues and discussions in international organizations and fora. We will enhance this dialogue in order to promote BRICS countries interests on the global scale. We welcome, in this regard, the adoption of Roadmap of BRICS Energy cooperation and the launch of practical cooperation within BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform (ERCP) including the preparation of joint reports. We note the importance of widening the scope of joint research, launching joint projects and strengthening the BRICS ERCP. 

69. We highlight the need to strengthen further BRICS cooperation in the fields of intellectual property, technical regulations, standards, metrology and conformity assessment. We commend the collaboration between our national IP Offices and the outcomes of cooperation among BRICS countries under the Working Mechanism on Technical Regulation, Standards, Metrology, Conformity Assessment and Accreditation and reaffirm the importance of further cooperation.

70. We commend the progress of BRICS countries in tackling new challenges in urban areas and note the contribution of the BRICS Urbanization Forum towards these efforts.

71. Recognizing tourism as an important driver for the BRICS countries’ economies, we acknowledge negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemics on the tourism industry and welcome further BRICS dialogue on cooperation in the field of tourism.

72. We recall that our countries produce more than a third of the global agricultural output and emphasize BRICS role and responsibility in ensuring the sustainability of the agriculture and food sector, global food security and nutrition. We emphasize the importance of a targeted, proportionate, transparent, timely and consistent with WTO rules approach when taking urgent response measures in connection with the spread of COVID-19 and minimizing the impact of these measures on the functioning of global food supply chains and the stability of agricultural markets consistent with national requirements. We commit to withdraw such measures as soon as they are no longer needed to fight the COVID-19.

73. We will reinforce the resilience of agriculture, rural areas and farmers in light of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic through deepening agricultural cooperation including South-South and the promotion of comprehensive development of rural areas, through forms of support compatible with WTO rules on agriculture. Rural development is of great significance to the balanced improvement of the world agricultural production, food security and the implementation of sustainable goals in agriculture. We acknowledge the importance of avoiding food loss and waste and encourage joint efforts towards the reduction of food loss and waste.

74. Recalling all BRICS Leader’s Declarations since Ufa (2015), we reiterate our commitment to further enhance BRICS cooperation in addressing the challenges to health and human well-being including through developing effective joint responses to the continuing spread of major diseases (HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria and others) and the emergence of infections with a pandemic potential. We welcome the efforts of States in developing and implementing policies and initiatives regarding the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic that are fit for their specific national situations. In this regard we recall the decision in the Johannesburg Declaration (2018) to establish the BRICS Vaccine Research and Development Centre and encourage its timely and effective operationalization. We also welcome issuing the Review of the BRICS countries measures in the field of healthcare to counter the spread of the coronavirus disease and note Russia’s proposal to set up a BRICS Integrated Early Warning System for preventing mass infectious diseases risks for future consideration and discussion. We recognize the fundamental role of the United Nations system, including the WHO, in coordinating the comprehensive global response to COVID-19 pandemic and the central efforts of States therein. We stress, in this regard, the importance of enhancing BRICS countries’ positive contribution to international public health security, the need to pursue coordinated and decisive actions, both individually and collectively.

75. We take note of the progress made under the BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Framework Programme, which attracted multiple BRICS funding agencies and more than hundred BRICS projects supported in different thematic areas. This has facilitated networking of BRICS research organizations and scientists to work together and develop affordable solutions for common societal challenges. We recognize the importance of BRICS STI Cooperation in counteracting the spread and the impacts of COVID-19, including launching of a special joint R&D Call under BRICS STI Framework Programme and online experts exchanges. We acknowledge the progress achieved by the BRICS STI Steering Committee under the BRICS STI Architecture, especially on the thematic working groups.

76. We emphasize the crucial role of education for enhancing human capital, for the re-skilling and up-skilling of people in the post-COVID 19 recovery, achieving sustainable development and allowing for an inclusive economic growth. We are committed to enhancing cooperation particularly in the field of TVET and higher education, through best practices exchanges of knowledge and expertise, including in digital technologies for distant and blended learning, which have become necessary tools for the provision of high quality, steadily accessible education.

77. We remain committed to enhancing international cooperation to put an end to tax avoidance strategies that exploit gaps and mismatches in tax rules. We are committed to promoting efforts on improving compliance with internationally agreed standards on tax transparency and exchange of information and look forward to further progress in information sharing for improvement of our tax authorities' abilities and technical capacity to deter, detect and disrupt illicit financial flows, tax evasion and tax avoidance.

78. We note the progress in cooperation among the BRICS countries’ competition authorities, aimed at ensuring conditions for fair competition in priority markets and those critical for socio-economic development, improving competition policy and enforcement. We note the extension of the Memorandum of Understanding between the BRICS Competition Authorities on cooperation in the field of competition law and policy. We acknowledge the BRICS International Competition Law and Policy Center activities. We note the holding of the VII BRICS International Competition Conference in China in 2021.

79. We underline the importance of the BRICS national statistical agencies continuing their collaboration on methodological approaches to ensure their comparability and in this regard look forward to close intra-BRICS engagement on a regular basis.

80. We recommit to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and recognize that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. We recognize that many developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America will also take longer to recover from the COVID-19 and its associated implications. We call on donor countries to honour their Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments, and to facilitate capacity building and the transfer of technology to developing countries together with additional development resources.

81. We reiterate the importance of continuous dialogue among BRICS countries in the field of disaster management and acknowledge the outcomes of the BRICS Joint Task Force on Disaster Risk Management Meeting and encourage further cooperation in this area.

82. We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of the Paris Agreement adopted under the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances. We urge developed countries included in Annex II to scale up the provision of financial, technical, technological and capacity-building assistance to developing countries to support mitigation and adaptation action. We also acknowledge in this respect the Statement of the 6th BRICS Ministers of Environment Meeting on 30 July 2020. We welcome the progress within the BRICS Environmentally Sound Technology (BEST) Platform, including the initiative to establish the BEST Platform “matrix”. We look forward to further strengthening cooperation on environmental issues, in particular combating marine plastic litter as a key focus of the BRICS Clean Rivers Programme.

83. We acknowledge the importance of working together towards the development and the adoption of the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework at the 15th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP15), including implementation of support mechanisms, in a way that addresses, in a balanced manner, the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources.

84. We call for enhanced intra-BRICS cooperation, including in relevant multilateral fora, to jointly combat customs offenses, develop customs technologies and cooperate in capacity building. We welcome the substantial progress made in the implementation of the Strategic Framework of BRICS Customs Cooperation. We are also encouraged by the significant strides that have been made in pursuing technical consensus on the Agreement on Cooperation and Mutual Administrative Assistance in Customs Matters and welcome its early conclusion. 

85. We express our support to enhancing interactions within the framework of BRICS Business Council as an effective way to forge closer business linkages between the BRICS countries, including in trade promotion, investments, infrastructure development, digital economy and exchanges of best practices in the fields of energy, effective regulation, responsible business conduct, development financing. We also welcome the activities of the BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism, including the progress in developing the principles for the BRICS development institutions’ responsible financing and efficient green finance mechanisms.

86. We further welcome the adoption of the Declaration on the establishing of the BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (WBA) which provides a solid platform for promotion of women's economic empowerment in the BRICS countries aiming at expanding the role of women as drivers of economic growth.

Cultural and People-to-People Exchanges

87. We reaffirm the importance of BRICS people-to-people exchanges in enhancing mutual understanding, friendship and cooperation among our nations and peoples. We note with satisfaction, in this regard, that under the Russian BRICS Chairmanship, despite the pandemic-related limitations, activities in the fields of local governance, culture, sports, arts, films, youth and academic exchanges continued largely uninterrupted, which contributed to making substantive progress in this pillar. We encourage further diversified initiatives and activities.

88. We emphasize the importance of BRICS parliamentary exchanges and take note with satisfaction of the BRICS Parliamentary and Young Parliamentarians’ Fora in 2020. We look forward to further strengthening BRICS parliamentary cooperation and its contribution to enhancing BRICS partnership. We also acknowledge the holding of the BRICS Friendship Cities and Local Government Cooperation Forum, II BRICS Municipal Forum, as well as related grass-roots initiatives.

89. We commend the outcomes of the BRICS Chief Justices Forum, which discussed the protection of rights and interests of economic actors, entrepreneurs and consumers through measures of administrative judicial procedure and adapting court mechanisms to the new realities of the “digital age”. 

90. We take note of the outcomes of II Formal Meeting of the BRICS Supreme Audit Institutions Heads and recognize the significance of advancing BRICS cooperation in this realm, including within the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI), in the spirit of inclusiveness, openness and mutually beneficial knowledge sharing. 

91. We commend the progress in cultural cooperation and acknowledge its role in enhancing understanding between peoples. We welcome the outcomes of the V Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Culture and look forward to further exchanges in the various ongoing initiatives in the field of culture and preservation of cultural heritage, including between our national museums, libraries, art galleries and theatres, among others. We note with satisfaction the organization of the V BRICS Film Festival. We take note of Russia’s initiative on the establishment of a BRICS Working Group on Culture.

92. We welcome the First BRICS Sports Ministers Meeting and the adoption of the Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in the field of Physical Culture and Sports. We look forward to further dynamic collaboration in sports between BRICS countries, acknowledging, inter alia, the importance of annual BRICS Sports Games. In this context we look forward to China to host Beijing Winter Olympic Games.

93. Being committed to upholding continuity of BRICS partnership for the benefit of prosperity and friendship of future generations of our countries and our youth, we recognize the vast potential and stress the importance to further develop BRICS youth exchanges, including in such areas as science, innovation, energy, ICTs, volunteerism and entrepreneurship. We note with satisfaction the holding of the Meetings of BRICS Youth Officials, BRICS Young Diplomats and Young Scientists Fora, and other informal youth related initiatives, including BRICS Youth Energy Summit and cooperation within the framework of BRICS Youth Energy Agency and the IV International BRICSMATH.COM online mathematics competition for school students and the encouraging participation in it of children of all five countries. We welcome the upcoming annual BRICS Youth Summit.

94. We note with satisfaction the holding of the BRICS Ministers of Education Meeting and commend the progress in our education cooperation. We encourage consolidation of the BRICS Network University and BRICS University League so as to provide synergetic engagement of their activities. We welcome deepening Network University members’ cooperation aimed at building the universities’ capabilities and strengthening their role in driving the digital transformation and leveraging innovations to provide quality education, increase economic growth and expand prosperity.

95. We commend the outcomes of the Meetings of the BRICS Think Tank Council (BTTC) and BRICS Academic Forum, acknowledging the progress made towards strengthening BRICS expert dialogue and exchanges among academic community to promote future-oriented research policy analysis and knowledge-sharing. In this regard the BTTC should continue to improve its internal mechanism and strengthen its connection with BRICS governmental sectors and other institutions including the NDB and the BRICS Business Council. We note the holding of the BRICS Civil Forum and acknowledge launching the BRICS Solutions Awards.

96. India, China, South Africa and Brazil commend Russian BRICS Chairmanship in 2020 and express their gratitude to the government and people of Russia for holding the XII BRICS Summit.

97. Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa extend full support to India for its BRICS Chairmanship in 2021 and the holding of the XIII BRICS Summit.

Annex 1: BRICS Cooperation Outcomes 

The following outcomes, initiatives or documents have been adopted or signed:

1.Declaration of the Heads of the BRICS Competition Authorities (19 May 2020);

2.Extension of Memorandum of Understanding between the BRICS Competition Authorities on cooperation in the field of competition law and policy (19 May 2020);

3.Joint Communiqué of the Meeting of the Heads of BRICS Tax Authorities (29 May 2020);

4.BRICS Understanding on Investment Facilitation (23 July 2020);

5.Guidelines for Promoting Effective Participation of MSMEs in International Trade (23 July 2020);

6.Joint Communiqué of the 10th Meeting of the BRICS Trade Ministers (23 July 2020);

7.Joint Statement by BRICS Trade Ministers on Multilateral Trading System and the WTO Reform (23 July 2020);

8.Statement of the BRICS Competition Authorities on COVID-19 (23 July 2020);

9.Joint Statement of the 6th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Environment (30 July 2020);

10.Joint Communiqué of the 4th Meeting of the BRICS Anti-Drug Working Group (12 August 2020);

11.Declaration of BRICS Ministers of Industries on strengthening cooperation in the area of the New Industrial Revolution (24 August 2020);

12.Memorandum of Understanding on BRICS cooperation in the field of Physical Culture and Sport (25 August 2020);

13.Joint Statement of the Deputy Ministers of Foreign Affairs/Special Envoys on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) (26 August 2020);

14.Declaration of the 5th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Culture 

(3 September 2020);

15.Media Statement of the Stand-Alone Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs / International Relations (4 September 2020);

16.Declaration of the 6th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Communications (17 September 2020);

17.Declaration of the 10th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Agriculture and Agrarian Development (23 September 2020);

18.Joint Statement of the IX Meeting of BRICS TB Research Network 

(2 October 2020);

19.Joint Statement of the Meeting BRICS Ministers of Labor and Employment (9 October 2020);

20.Joint Communiqué of the Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Energy 

(14 October 2020);

21.Road Map for BRICS Energy Cooperation up to 2025 (14 October 2020);

22.BRICS Energy Report (15 October 2020);

23.BRICS Energy Technology Report (15 October 2020);

24.Declaration of the 7th Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Education 

(21 October 2020);

25.Consolidated Document “BRICS Countries Measures taken in the Field of Healthcare to Counter the Spread of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)” (11 November 2020);

26.BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Declaration 2020 

(13 November 2020);

27.BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Calendar of Activities 2020-2021 (13 November 2020);

28.BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Overview dedicated to the Five-Year Anniversary of Cooperation in Science, Technology and Innovation under the memorandum of Understanding (13 November 2020);

29.BRICS Counter Terrorism Strategy (17 November 2020);

30.Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership 2025 (17 November 2020);

31.Declaration of the X Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Health 

(16 November 2020).

Outcomes of the other branches of government, business and people-to-people meetings:

1.Declaration of the 2nd Meeting of the Heads of the BRICS Supreme Audit Institutions

(25 August 2020);

2.Joint Statement of the BRICS Chief Justices Forum (8 September 2020);

3.Declaration of the BRICS Friendship Cities and Local Government Cooperation Forum (20 October 2020);

4.Recommendations of the 12th BRICS Academic Forum to the Leaders “BRICS New Vision For A Better World” (24 October 2020);

5.Declaration of the 9th BRICS Trade Union Forum (30 October 2020);

6.Declaration on the Establishment of the BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (2 November 2020);

7.Memorandum of BRICS DFIs Principles for Responsible Financing (16 November 2020).

Russian BRICS Chairmanship Statements:

1.Russian BRICS Chairmanship Statement on the Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia Epidemic Outbreak in China (11 February 2020);

2.Russian BRICS Chairmanship Statement on the Outcomes of 

the 6th BRICS Parliamentary Forum (2 November 2020).

Annex 2: Meetings held under the Chairmanship of the Russian Federation

The following meetings were held under Russia’s BRICS Chairmanship: 

LEADERS Meetings:

1.XII BRICS Summit – 17 November 2020 (VTC).

SHERPAS/SOUS-SHERPAS MEETINGS:

1.1st Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 11-13 February 2020 

(St. Petersburg, Russia);

2.2nd Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 2 July 2020 (VTC);

3.3rd Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 31 August – 2 September, 11 September 2020 (VTC);

4.4th Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 5-7 November, 

9-13 November, 16 November 2020 (VTC).

Ministerial AND HEADS OF AGENCIES Meetings:

1.Extraordinary Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations – 28 April 2020 (VTC);

2.Meeting of Heads of BRICS Tax Authorities – 27-28 May 2020 (VTC);

3.Meeting of Heads of BRICS Space Agencies – 15 July 2020 (VTC);

4.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Economy and Foreign Trade – 23 July 2020 (VTC);

5.Meeting of BRICS Competition Authorities – 23 July 2020 (VTC);

6.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Environment – 30 July 2020 (VTC);

7.Meeting of Heads of BRICS National Standardization Bodies – 

19 August 2020 (VTC);

8.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Industry – 24 August 2020 (VTC);

9.Meeting of BRICS Sports Ministers – 25 August 2020 (VTC);

10.Meeting of BRICS Heads of Intellectual Property Offices – 26 August 2020 (VTC);

11.Stand-alone Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations – 4 September 2020 (VTC);

12.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Culture – 2-3 September 2020 (VTC);

13.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Communication – 17 September 2020 (VTC);

14.Meeting of BRICS National Security Advisors – 17 September 2020 (VTC);

15.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Agriculture and Agrarian Development – 23 September 2020 (VTC);

16.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Labor and Employment – 9 October 2020 (VTC);

17.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Energy – 14 October 2020 (VTC);

18.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Education – 21 October 2020 (VTC);

19.Meeting of BRICS Tourism Ministers – 28 October 2020 (VTC);

20.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Finances and Central Bank Governors – 9 November 2020 (VTC);

21.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Health – 11 November 2020 (VTC);

22.Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Science, Technology and Innovation – 13 November 2020 (VTC).

Senior Officials and Sectoral Meetings: 

1.1st Meeting of BRICS Anti-Corruption Working Group (ACWG) – on the margins of the G20 Meeting of Anti-Corruption Working Group – 3 February 2020 (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia); 

2.1st Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 10-11 February 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

3.Meeting of BRICS Council on Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism within the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) (BRICS Council on AML/CFT) – 16 February 2020(Paris, France);

4.Meeting of BRICS Senior Officials Committee on Energy – 20-21 February 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

5.Meeting of BRICS Deputy Ministers of Finances and Central Bank Governors – 21 February 2020 (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia);

6.23rd Meeting of the BRICS Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 26-28 February 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

7.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on the Research of Competition Issues of Pharmaceutical Markets – 13 March 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

8.Expert Meeting of BRICS Tourism Authorities – 18 March 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

9.Expert Meeting of BRICS National Statistical Offices on BRICS Statistical Publication – 30-31 March 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

10.2nd Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 8 April 2020 (VTC);

11.3rd Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 21 April 2020 (VTC);

12.24th Meeting of the BRICS Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 29 April 2020 (VTC);

13.Meeting of BRICS Health Senior Officials – 7 May 2020 (VTC);

14.Meeting of BRICS Deputy Ministers of Finances and Central Bank Governors – 14 May 2020 (VTC);

15.Working Meeting of BRICS Youth Officials – 22 May 2020 (VTC);

16.4th Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 25 May 2020 (VTC);

17.Extraordinary Meeting of Heads of International Units of BRICS Competition Authorities – 27 May 2020 (VTC);

18.BRICS Expert Meeting on Tax Matters – 27-28 May 2020 (VTC);

19.5th Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 11 June 2020 (VTC);

20.Meeting of BRICS Tuberculosis (TB) Research Network – 18 June 2020 (VTC);

21.Meeting of BRICS Council on Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (BRICS Council on AML/CFT) – 18-23 June

2020 (VTC); 

22.6th Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 9 July 2020 (VTC);

23.Meeting of Deputy Heads of BRICS Space Agencies – 13 July 2020 (VTC);

24.7th Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Solid State Lightning – 14-15 July 2020 (VTC);

25.25th BRICS Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 16 July 2020 (VTC);

26.Meeting of BRICS Agricultural Cooperation Working Group – 16 July 2020 (VTC);

27.Meeting of BRICS Senior Officials Committee on Energy and BRICS Working Group on Energy Saving – 27-28 July 2020 (VTC);

28.Meeting of BRICS Joint Task Force on Disaster Risk Management – 

30 July 2020 (VTC);

29.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Environment – 30 July 2020 (VTC);

30.Meeting of BRICS Customs Specialists – 4-6 August 2020 (VTC);

31.Meeting of BRICS Anti-Drug Working Group – 12 August 2020 (VTC);

32.Expert Meeting of BRICS Ministries of Industry, Meeting of PartNIR Advisory Group – 17 August 2020 (VTC);

33.Meeting of BRICS Deputy Foreign Ministers/Special Envoys on the Middle East and North Africa (BRICS MENA) – 26 August 2020 (VTC);

34.BRICS Working Group on Security in the Use of ICTs – 26-27 August 2020 (VTC);

35.Meeting of BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group – 31 August – 

2 September 2020 (VTC);

36.BRICS Expert Meeting on Culture – 2 September 2020 (VTC);

37.Meeting of BRICS Deputy Ministers of Finance and Central Bank Governors – 3-4 September 2020 (VTC);

38.Meeting of BRICS CRA Standing Committee – 3 September 2020 (VTC);

39.2nd Meeting of BRICS Anti-Corruption Working Group – on the margins of the G20 Meeting of Anti-Corruption Working Group – 7 September 2020 (VTC);

40.iBRICS Network Training Workshop on Science Parks and Incubators – 5, 12, 19, 26 September 2020 (VTC);

41.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on ICT Cooperation – 15-16 September 2020 (VTC);

42.3rd Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Ocean and Polar Science and Technology – 23 September 2020 (VTC);

43.6th Meeting of BRICS Astronomy Working Group – 24-25 September 2020 (VTC);

44.Meeting of Social Communication Officers of the BRICS Foreign Ministers – 29 September 2020 (VTC);

45.2nd Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Material Science and Nanotechnology – 1-2 October 2020 (VTC);

46.Meeting of BRICS Tuberculosis (TB) Research Network – 2 October 2020 (VTC);

47.4th Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Information and Communication Technologies and High-Performance Computing (WG on ICT and HPC) – 8-9 October 2020 (VTC);

48.7th Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 13 October 2020 (VTC);

49.BRICS Energy Senior Officials Meeting – 13-14 October 2020 (VTC);

50.2nd Meeting of BRICS Working Group on New and Renewable Sources of Energy and Energy Efficiency – 14-15 October 2020 (VTC);

51.2nd Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Photonics – 13-15 October 2020 (VTC);

52.Meeting of BRICS Network University (BRICS NU) International Steering Committee – 14 October 2020 (VTC);

53.4th Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Science, Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship – 15-16 October 2020 (VTC);

54.Meeting of BRICS Council on Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism within the FATF (BRICS Council on AML/CFT) – on the margins of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Meeting – 18-23 October 2020 (VTC);

55.3rd Meeting of BRICS Anti-Corruption Working Group – 19 October 2020 (VTC);

56.BRICS Education Senior Officials Meeting – 20 October 2020 (VTC);

57.8th Meeting of BRICS STI Steering Committee – 5 November 2020 (VTC);

58.BRICS Working Group for Research of Competition Issues in the Automotive Markets – 5-6 November 2020 (VTC);

59.6th Meeting of BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Funding Working Group – 10 November 2020 (VTC);

60.Special Workshop “Prospects of science and technology in BRICS countries” in the framework of X International Academic Conference “Foresight and STI policy” – 11 November 2020 (VTC);

61.Meeting of BRICS Coordination Committee on Antimonopoly Policy – 12 November 2020 (VTC);

62.10th Meeting of BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Senior Officials – 12 November 2020 (VTC);

other branches of government, business and people-to-people meetings:

1.BRICS Young Parliamentarians’ Forum – 5-7 March 2020 (St. Petersburg, Russia);

2.Roundtable discussion on “Consumer protection in the era of 

e-Commerce in the BRICS countries” – 13 March 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

3.BRICS scientific and practical conference on “BRICS Economic Partnership Strategy” – 19 March 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

4.Preparatory round of IV BRICSMATH.COM international online math contest – 22 April – 22 May 2020 (online);

5.Roundtable Discussion "Support and Development of BRICS Small and Medium Enterprises (SME)" – 14 July 2020 (VTC);

6.Meeting of BRICS Think Tanks Council (BTTC) – 15 July 2020 (VTC);

7.Inaugural meeting of BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (BRICS WBA) – 20 July 2020 (VTC);

8.Meeting of BRICS Business Council (BRICS BC) – 22 July 2020 (VTC);

9.Online Mathematics competition for students from Grades 1-12 BRICSMATH.COM – 21 July – 31 October 2020 (online);

10.Meeting of Heads of BRICS Supreme Audit Institutions – 25 August 2020 (VTC);

11.BRICS Chief Justices Forum – 8 September 2020 (VTC);

12.BRICS Urbanization Forum – 9-10 September 2020 (VTC);

13.5th BRICS Young Scientists Forum – 21-25 September 2020 (VTC);

14.BRICS Civil Forum – 23-25 September 2020 (VTC);

15.BRICS Film Festival – 1-7 October 2020 (online-offline);

16.International Research and Educational Program “BRICS School” – 

5-10 October 2020 (online);

17.#TogetherBrighter International Energy Saving Festival – 10 October 2020 (online-offline);

18.Presentation of BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform – 15 October 2020 (VTC);

19.BRICS Youth Energy Summit – 16 October 2020 (VTC);

20.BRICS Friendship Cities and Local Government Cooperation Forum – 19-20 October 2020 (Kazan, Russia);

21.BRICS Young Diplomats Forum – 21-24 October 2020 (Kazan, Russia);

22.BRICS Business Forum (BRICS BF) – 20, 22, 26, 28 October 2020 (VTC);

23.International BRICS Youth Business Incubator – 20 October – 2 November (VTC);

24.Meeting of BRICS Think Tanks Council (BTTC) – 22-24 October 2020 (VTC);

25.BRICS Academic Forum – 22-24 October 2020 (VTC);

26.BRICS Parliamentary Forum – 27 October 2020 (VTC);

27.9th BRICS Trade Union Forum – 30 October 2020 (VTC);

28.Meeting of BRICS Women’s Business Alliance (BRICS WBA) – 2 November 2020 (VTC);

29.BRICS Cultural Festival – November 2020 (online);

30.2nd BRICS International Municipal Forum – 5-6 November 2020 (St. Petersburg, Russia);

31.Meeting of BRICS Business Council (BRICS BC) – 10 November 2020 (VTC);

32.BRICS Future Skills Challenge – 9-17 November 2020 (online-offline);

33.BRICS Joint Financial Forum/Meeting of CEOs of BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism (ICM) – 16 November 2020 (online).

the remaining events of Russia’s BRICS Chairmanship 2020:

1.VII BRICS Legal Forum – 18-19 November 2020 (online);

2.BRICS Transport Senior Officials Meeting – 20 November 2020 (VTC);

3.Meeting of BRICS Ministers and Heads of Departments for Youth – 3 December 2020 (VTC);

4.BRICS Youth Summit – 29 November – 3 December 2020 (online);

5.5th Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 8-9 December 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

6.BRICS Foreign Policy Planning Dialogue – 10 December 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

7.4th Meeting of Heads of BRICS Prosecution Services – 16 December 2020 (VTC);

8.Meeting of Heads of BRICS National Statistics Offices – November-December 2020 (VTC);

9.BRICS International Festival of Theater School – December 2020 (Moscow, Russia);

10.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Biotechnology and Biomedicine, including Human Health and Neuroscience – December 2020 (VTC);

11.4th Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Research Infrastructure and Mega-Science Projects – November-December 2020 (VTC);

12.BRICS Technology Transfer Cooperation Conference and related activities – November-December 2020 (VTC);

13.3rd Meeting of BRICS Academies of Science – December 2020 (VTC);

14.BRICS Seminar on Governance (organized by China) – December 2020 (VTC);

15.BRICS Forum on People-to-People and Cultural Exchanges 2020 (organized by China) – December 2020 (VTC).

In total, [137] meetings will have been held under Russia’s BRICS Chairmanship.


XI BRICS Summit Brasilia Declaration

Brasilia, Brazil, 14 November 2019

Preamble

1. We, the Leaders of the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Russian Federation, the Republic of India, the People's Republic of China and the Republic of South Africa met on 14 November 2019 in Brasília, Brazil, at the Eleventh BRICS Summit, which was held under the theme “BRICS: economic growth for an innovative future”. 

2. As leaders of vibrant nations, we reaffirm our fundamental commitment to the principle of sovereignty, mutual respect and equality and to the shared goal of building a peaceful, stable and prosperous world. These concepts, values and objectives provide a solid foundation and clear guidance for our mutually beneficial and pragmatic cooperation. Building on the work of successive summits in the pillars of economy, peace and security and people-to-people exchanges, we will continue to strengthen BRICS cooperation for the benefit and welfare of our peoples and enhance the traditional ties of friendship amongst our countries. 

3. We are pleased with the outcomes of the 2019 BRICS Chairship (Annex 1). We recall the more than one hundred meetings held this year (Annex 2). We welcome the Ministerial and other high-level Meetings held this year in the areas of finance, trade, foreign affairs, national security matters, communications, environment, labor and employment, science, technology and innovation, energy, agriculture, health and culture. We also note the Meeting of New Development Bank Board of Governors. 

4. We welcome, among other achievements, the establishment of the Innovation BRICS Network (iBRICS); the adoption of the New Architecture on Science, Technology and Innovation (STI), which will be implemented through the BRICS STI Steering Committee, and the Terms of Reference of the BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform. We also welcome the holding of the BRICS Strategies for Countering Terrorism Seminar, the Workshop on Human Milk Banks and the BRICS Meeting on Asset Recovery. We commend the signature of the Memorandum of Understanding among BRICS Trade and Investment Promotion Agencies (TIPAs), and the establishment of the BRICS Women Business Alliance (WBA). We further appreciate the approval of the Collaborative Research Program for Tuberculosis, and other initiatives promoted by the 2019 BRICS Chairship. 

Strengthening and reforming the multilateral system

5. We remain committed to multilateralism, cooperation of sovereign States to maintain peace and security, advance sustainable development and ensure the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all and build a brighter shared future for the international community. We reaffirm our commitment to helping overcome the significant challenges currently facing multilateralism, as well as upholding the central role of the UN in international affairs and respecting international law, including the Charter of the United Nations, its purposes and principles. 

6. We reiterate the urgent need to strengthen and reform the multilateral system, including the UN, the WTO, the IMF and other international organizations, which we will continue working to make more inclusive, democratic and representative, including through greater participation of emerging markets and developing countries in international decision-making. We reiterate our commitment to shaping a more fair, just, equitable and representative multipolar international order. We also underline the imperative that international organizations be fully driven by Member States and promote the interests of all. 

7. We recall the 2005 World Summit Outcome document and reaffirm the need for a comprehensive reform of the UN, including its Security Council, with a view to making it more representative, effective, and efficient, and to increase the representation of the developing countries so that it can adequately respond to global challenges. China and Russia reiterate the importance they attach to the status and role of Brazil, India and South Africa in international affairs and support their aspiration to play a greater role in the UN. 

8. We express our commitment to sustainable development in its three dimensions - economic, social and environmental - in a balanced and integrated manner. All our citizens, in all parts of our respective territories, including remote areas, deserve to fully enjoy the benefits of sustainable development. International cooperation in this field, as in all others, must respect national sovereignty and domestic legal and institutional frameworks and arrangements, as well as practices and procedures. 

9. We reiterate the importance of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and call for redoubled efforts for its timely implementation. We call on developed countries to fully implement their Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitments and to provide developing countries with additional development resources. 

10. We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of the Paris Agreement adopted under the principles of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), including the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances. We urge developed countries included in Annex II to scale up the provision of financial, technological and capacity-building assistance to developing countries to support mitigation and adaptation action. We expect that the first replenishment of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) by the end of 2019 will significantly exceed the initial resource mobilization, ensuring that financial contributions by donors match the ambition, needs and priorities of developing countries. We are also committed to working for the success of UNFCCC COP 25, particularly with regard to achieving a balanced and comprehensive outcome on all remaining items of the Paris Agreement Work Program.

11. We recall the BRICS MOU on Regional Aviation and value the cooperation among BRICS countries in the field of civil aviation. Acknowledging the critical role played by the aviation sector in emerging markets, including in BRICS countries, and considering the potential impacts of the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) on the growth of the aviation sector, we reiterate our commitment to work together on the review process of the framework. 

12. We are committed to contributing to and supporting the development of the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and to the successful outcome of the 15th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity, to be held in Kunming, China, in 2020. We will deepen our dialogue and cooperation on the respective positions concerning biodiversity. We expect that the CBD’s three objectives are considered in the Framework in a balanced manner, so as to avoid overlooking the often disregarded sustainable use of biological diversity components and Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) pillars. 

13. We are committed to implement the outcomes of COP 14 UNCCD with an aim to achieve SDG 15.3 by 2030 to combat desertification, restore degraded land and soil, and strive to achieve a land degradation-neutral world. We welcome enhancement of South-South Cooperation through the establishment of the Centre for Sustainable Land Restoration by India for capacity building, exchange of database and information regarding the Land Degradation Neutrality Target Setting Programme. We acknowledge the New Delhi Declaration on “Investing in Land and Unlocking Opportunities” and the Ordos Declaration. 

14. We express serious concern over persistent threats to international peace and security and commit to work for lasting peace for all, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and all applicable international obligations. We reaffirm our commitment to the principles of good-faith, sovereign equality of States, non-intervention in matters within the domestic jurisdiction of any State, and the duty to cooperate, consistently with the Charter of the UN. Implementation of these principles excludes imposition of coercive measures not based on international law. 

15. We emphasize the importance of the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on their Destruction (BTWC) as a pillar of the international security system. We underline the need to comply with and strengthen the BTWC, including by adopting a Protocol to the Convention that provides for, inter alia, an efficient verification mechanism. We reaffirm that the BTWC is the core instrument for biological and toxin weapons. Its functions, including in what concerns the UN Security Council, should not be duplicated by other mechanisms. Efforts aimed at the resolution of implementation issues should be consistent with the BTWC. 

16. We reaffirm support for the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) and to the preservation of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) as an effective disarmament and non-proliferation instrument. We stress the need for the States Parties to the CWC to stand united and be engaged in constructive dialogue with a view to restoring the culture of consensus in the OPCW. 

17. We express our serious concern about the possibility of an arms race in outer space and reaffirm the need to carry on activities in the exploration and peaceful uses of outer space in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations. We emphasize the urgent need to negotiate a legally binding multilateral instrument that could fill the gap in the international legal regime applicable to outer space, including on the prevention of the placement of weapons in outer space. We stress that practical transparency and confidence building measures may also contribute towards this goal. In this connection, we welcome the relevant work carried out by the UN Group of Governmental Experts on the Prevention of an Arms Race in Outer Space (PAROS) and regret that it was unable to reach consensus on its report. We underscore that any instrument on this matter should be non-discriminatory and contain operative provisions on the right to develop technology for peaceful purposes. 

18. We underscore the importance of an open, secure, peaceful, stable, accessible and non-discriminatory environment for information and communications technologies (ICTs). We emphasize the importance of universally agreed norms, rules and principles, under the auspices of the UN, for the responsible behavior of States in the realm of ICTs, and uphold the centrality of the United Nations in their development. In this connection, we welcome the establishment of a UN open-ended working group on this matter, as well as the launch of a new edition of the Group of Governmental Experts (GGE). While supporting both mechanisms, we underline that the dual-track process can provide complementarity and synergies in the international efforts in this matter. 

19. We reaffirm our commitment to tackling the misuse of ICTs for criminal and terrorist activities. New challenges and threats in this respect require international cooperation, including through discussions on possible frameworks of cooperation, among which a UN universal binding regulatory instrument on the criminal use of ICTs. We recognize the progress made by the BRICS countries in promoting cooperation through the Working Group on Security in the Use of Information and Communication Technologies (WGSICT), which approved its revised Terms of Reference, and through the BRICS Roadmap of Practical Cooperation on Ensuring Security in the Use of ICTs. Bearing in mind previous BRICS Summits, we reaffirm the importance of establishing legal frameworks of cooperation among BRICS member States on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and acknowledge the work of the WGSICT towards consideration and elaboration of proposals on this matter. We take note of both the proposal by Russia on a BRICS intergovernmental agreement on cooperation on ensuring security in the use of ICTs and of the Brazilian initiative towards bilateral agreements among BRICS countries on the matter. 

20. We condemn terrorism in all its forms and manifestations, which should not be associated with any religion, nationality or civilization, and recognize terrorist acts as criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivations whenever, wherever and by whomsoever committed. We urge for concerted efforts to fight against terrorism under UN auspices in accordance with international law, recognize the primary role of States and their competent authorities in preventing and countering terrorism and express our conviction that a comprehensive approach is necessary to ensure effective results in combating terrorism. We recall the responsibility of all States to prevent financing of terrorist networks and terrorist actions, including those from their territories. We also call for an expeditious conclusion and adoption of the Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism within the UN framework. We emphasize the importance of preventing and combating the financing of terrorism, implementing relevant UNSC resolutions and welcome in this regard the adoption of UNSC Resolution 2462 (2019). To address the threat of chemical and biological terrorism, we emphasize the need to launch multilateral negotiations on an international convention for the suppression of acts of chemical and biological terrorism, including at the Conference on Disarmament. 

21. We recognize progress made in BRICS cooperation in counter-terrorism and welcome the results of the Fourth Meeting of the BRICS Counter-Terrorism Working Group, including the establishment of thematic sub-working groups and the holding in Brasília of the Seminar "BRICS Strategies for Countering Terrorism". 

22. We reaffirm our commitment to combating illicit financial flows (IFFs) and to closely cooperating within the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the FATF-style regional bodies (FSRBs), as well as in other multilateral, regional and bilateral fora. We emphasize the importance of upholding and supporting the objectives of the FATF and of intensifying our cooperation to implement and improve FAFT Standards. We value and encourage the dialogue among BRICS countries in key issues of the Anti-Money Laundering/Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) agenda, bearing in mind the proposed institutionalization of the AML/CFT BRICS Council. We underscore the importance of the work of national Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs). 

Economic and Financial Cooperation

23. Since our last meeting, global economic growth has weakened, and downside risks have increased. Trade tensions and policy uncertainty have taken a toll on confidence, trade, investment and growth. In this context, we recall the importance of open markets, fair, just and non-discriminatory business and trade environments, structural reforms, effective and fair competition, promoting investment and innovation, as well as financing for infrastructure and development. We stress the need for greater participation of developing countries in global value chains. We will continue to cooperate within the G20 and advance the interests of EMEs and developing countries.

24. While noting that the BRICS countries have been the main drivers of global growth over the last decade and currently represent close to a third of global output, we are convinced that continued implementation of structural reforms will enhance our growth potential. Trade expansion among BRICS members will further contribute to strengthening international trade flows. We further advocate for continued use of fiscal, monetary and structural policies to achieve strong, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth. We call on major advanced and emerging market economies to continue policy dialogue and coordination in the context of the G20 and other fora to advance these objectives and to address potential risks. 

25. We reaffirm our commitment to a strong, quota-based and adequately resourced IMF at the center of the global financial safety net. We are deeply disappointed that the 15th General Review of Quotas (GRQ) failed in increasing the quota size of the Fund and realigning quota shares of member countries, including in favor of emerging markets and dynamic economies (EMDEs), which remain under-represented in the Fund. We also support protecting the voice and representation of the poorest members. We call upon the IMF to start work on quota and governance reform on the basis of the principles agreed in 2010 under the 16th GRQ in right earnest and within a tight timeframe.

26. We reiterate the fundamental importance of a rules-based, transparent, non-discriminatory, open, free and inclusive international trade. We remain committed to preserving and strengthening the multilateral trading system, with the World Trade Organization at its center. It is critical that all WTO members avoid unilateral and protectionist measures, which run counter to the spirit and rules of the WTO. 

27. We recognize the importance of necessary WTO reform, including in the lead up to the 12th WTO Ministerial Conference, to ensure the effectiveness and relevance of the Organization and its capacity to better address current and future challenges. Our countries will work with all WTO Members to advance a process for necessary reform that is balanced, open, transparent and that promotes inclusivity and development. The reform must, inter alia, preserve the centrality, core values and fundamental principles of the WTO, and consider the interests of all members, including developing countries and LDCs.

28. We emphasize the importance of the WTO Dispute Settlement Mechanism, with its two-stage binding adjudication system. The Appellate Body is essential to the regular and effective functioning of the Organization and the fulfillment of its rules. We underline the urgency to overcome the impasse in the appointment of members to the Appellate Body, and call upon all members to agree to initiate the Appellate Body selection process promptly.

29. We will explore in appropriate fora ways to promote and facilitate investments in productive sectors, e-commerce, MSMEs, infrastructure and connectivity, which will help to promote economic growth, trade and job creation. In so doing, we will take into account national imperatives and policy frameworks, with the aim of enhancing transparent, effective and an investment-friendly business environment.

30. We note with appreciation the role of the New Development Bank (NDB) in infrastructure and sustainable development financing. We stress the need for enhanced efforts to build a strong, balanced and high-quality portfolio of projects. We also note with pride the 5th anniversary of the signing of the NDB’s Articles of Agreement in Fortaleza, Brazil and welcome the upcoming mid-term review of NDB’s General Strategy. 

31. We welcome the opening of NDB Regional Offices and their activities in member countries. We welcome the establishment of the Americas Regional Office in São Paulo, along with its sub-office in Brasília, and look forward to the opening of the two remaining NDB Regional Offices in Russia and India in 2020. Building upon the core functions of the Bank’s headquarters, its Regional Offices shall contribute to expanding its operations and striving for a more robust project portfolio for all member countries. 

32. We acknowledge the progress made by the New Development Bank towards expanding its membership. The expansion of the NDB membership in accordance with its Articles of Agreement will strengthen the Bank’s role as a global development finance institution and further contribute to the mobilization of resources for infrastructure and sustainable development projects in BRICS and other EMDC’s. We look forward to the Board of Governors concluding the preparatory work with the aim of taking timely and considered decisions on the expansion of the membership in due course. 

33. We also attach great importance to other key cooperation initiatives, encompassing the BRICS Task Force on PPP and Infrastructure, which facilitates dialogue on infrastructure, including the G20 infrastructure agenda, the NDB’s Project Preparation Facility, the effectiveness of which will be enhanced by launching its first set of projects at the earliest, and our cooperation with a view to enhancing the representation of developing countries and emerging economies in the Multilateral Development Banks.

34. We note with satisfaction further steps undertaken to ensure the preparedness of the Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) and welcome the conclusion of a second test run, with added elements of complexity, of the de-linked portion of the CRA mechanism, including encashment.

35. We note the progress achieved in establishing a BRICS Local Currency Bond Fund and look forward to its operation. We support the on-going collaboration to develop our local bond markets. We will continue to communicate on other possible areas of currency cooperation, consistent with each central bank’s mandate.

36. We acknowledge the importance of the BRICS Survey on International Payments System. 

37. We positively assess the progress achieved under the Strategy for BRICS Economic Partnership including ensuring innovative, sustainable and inclusive economic growth and look forward to its review under the Russian Chairmanship in 2020. We applaud the progress that members have made in the implementation of the BRICS Action Agenda on Economic and Trade Cooperation, promoting several activities for policy sharing, information exchange, trade and investment facilitation and promotion, and development of trade studies. We welcome the conclusion of the BRICS Joint Trade Study Review, which identified trade and investment potential between BRICS countries, and instruct our ministers to continue to take actions that give support for joint initiatives of cooperation between our countries.

38. We welcome the holding of the BRICS Business Forum and acknowledge the efforts of the BRICS Business Council (BBC) in promoting trade and investment among its members by fostering cooperation in areas such as infrastructure, manufacturing, energy, agribusiness, including biotechnology, financial services, regional aviation, alignment of technical standards, skills development and digital economy. 

39. We welcome the establishment of the BRICS Women Business Alliance (WBA), which aims at increasing the role of women as drivers of economic growth, contributing to the economic empowerment of women in our countries and bringing a distinctive perspective on issues of interest for the BRICS business community. The WBA’s agenda, working methods and other matters related to its functioning will be determined by its members. We look forward to the selection of five members per country and the holding of the first meeting of the WBA to take place as early as possible in 2020. 

40. We call on the WBA and BBC to cooperate actively and coordinate their activities in order to be mutually reinforcing and strengthen the participation of women in all BRICS business initiatives, including in the BBC. 

Regional Situations

41. We reaffirm our commitment to collective efforts for peaceful settlement of disputes through political and diplomatic means, and recognize the role of the UN Security Council as bearing the primary responsibility for maintaining international peace and security. 

42. Regarding the situation in the Syrian Arab Republic, we reaffirm our strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of the country. We express our conviction that there can be no military solution to the Syrian conflict. We also reaffirm our commitment to advancing a Syrian-led and Syrian-owned, UN-facilitated political process in line with United Nations Security Council Resolution 2254 (2015). We express our support to the creation of the Constitutional Committee, thanks to the efforts of the UN, the Astana Guarantors and all states engaged in efforts to address the conflict through political means. We call on all parties to allow for unhindered humanitarian aid and to fully implement a sustainable ceasefire in the Idlib region, which does not encompass terrorist groups and entities that are designated as such by the UN Security Council. We reaffirm the international obligations to fight terrorism in all its forms and highlight the importance of unity in the fight against terrorist organizations in Syria that are designated as such by the UN Security Council. We also express concern with the suffering of vulnerable ethnic and religious communities and minorities. We remain deeply concerned with the humanitarian situation in Syria and the risks of dispersion of terrorists. We urge all parties to facilitate humanitarian aid to all Syrians throughout the country without preconditions. Bearing in mind the need to protect civilians under international human rights law and international humanitarian law throughout the territory of Syria, we welcome the efforts to de-escalate the crisis in northeastern Syria, in particular the Memorandum of Understanding signed by Russia and Turkey on 22 October 2019. 

43. We reaffirm our concern about the ongoing conflict and the deteriorating humanitarian crisis in the Republic of Yemen and call on the parties to facilitate the rapid, safe and unhindered access to humanitarian personnel and supplies across the country. We recognize that the Yemeni conflict has a significant impact on the security and stability of the whole region and reiterate our support of the Stockholm Process and the efforts of the United Nations towards a peaceful Yemeni-led resolution to the conflict, under the auspices of the United Nations. 

44. We are unanimous in our resolve that the conflicts elsewhere in the Middle East and North Africa should not be used as pretext to delay resolution of the long-standing Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Guided by the international framework in place, such as the relevant UN resolutions, the Madrid principles and the Arab Peace Initiative, we reiterate that the two-state solution will enable Israelis and Palestinians to live side by side, in peace and security. In this context, we express, furthermore, the need for new and creative diplomatic efforts to achieving a just and comprehensive settlement of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, in order to achieve peace and stability in the Middle East. 

45. We express our serious concern about the ongoing crisis in the Gulf region, including one-sided actions and reaffirm our support for the resolution of the existing disagreements through negotiations and diplomatic engagement. We stress the need for promoting a positive, constructive agenda in the region, in which all countries jointly respond to common threats and challenges. We underscore that UN member states are obligated under article 25 of the UN Charter to accept and carry out the Security Council decisions. 

46. We reiterate our continuous support to the people of Afghanistan in their effort to build a stable, inclusive, peaceful and prosperous country. We firmly believe that there is no military solution to the situation in Afghanistan. We reaffirm our support for a process of peace and reconciliation that is Afghan-owned and Afghan-led. We express concern over the persistence of terrorist-related attacks. 

47. We reaffirm our support for a peaceful, diplomatic and political solution to the situation in the Korean Peninsula, as well as for its complete denuclearization. We underline the importance of maintaining peace and stability in North East Asia. 

48. We commend the efforts of the African Union and sub-regional organizations in addressing regional issues and managing conflicts in the interest of peace and security in the continent and reiterate the importance of collaboration between the United Nations and the African Union. We urge all parties to cease immediately all military action in Libya and to engage with the United Nations and the AU High Level Committee on Libya and relevant stakeholders to ensure a comprehensive and sustainable solution through a Libyan-led and Libyan-owned political process.

49. We congratulate the Sudanese people for the signing on 17 August 2019 in Khartoum of the Political Agreement and Constitutional Declaration, which we consider an important step towards the stabilization of the political situation in Sudan. We acknowledge the efforts of the African Union and the Ethiopian government, whose mediation contributed to the conclusion of negotiations. 

Intra-BRICS Cooperation

50. We welcome Brazil´s hosting of the Stand-alone Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations in Rio de Janeiro on 26 July 2019. The Ministers exchanged views on major global political, security, economic and financial issues of common concern and on ways to strengthen BRICS cooperation. We also welcome the Meeting of BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations on the margins of the 74th Session of the United Nations General Assembly as part of continued cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including through our permanent missions to the UN. 

51. We welcome the 9th meeting of BRICS High Representatives for Security, held in October 2019, and commend them for enhancing BRICS dialogue on counter-terrorism, security in the use of ICTs, major international and regional hot spots, peacekeeping and transnational organized crime. 

52. We highlight the importance of science, technology and innovation (STI) as one of the main drivers of economic growth as well as a key element to shape the future of our societies. We welcome the results of the 7th Meeting of the BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Ministers and cooperation initiatives which have been fostering collaboration among researchers, young scientists and government bodies and bringing closer together our innovation ecosystems. We express satisfaction at the results achieved by the Innovation Action Plan, such as the creation of the iBRICS Network. We welcome the new BRICS STI Architecture aimed at streamlining and intensifying STI joint activities, to be implemented through the BRICS STI Steering Committee. 

53. We welcome the outcomes of the 5th Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Communication. We will continue to strengthen joint activities among BRICS countries, create new cooperation opportunities and expand and intensify partnerships already in progress including taking necessary steps for early setting up of the Digital BRICS Task Force (DBTF). We note with appreciation the outcome of the first meeting of the BRICS Institute of Future Networks (BIFN) Council. 

54. We recognize the New Industrial Revolution (NIR) as a critical development opportunity from which all countries must benefit equally, while acknowledging the challenges it brings. We note with satisfaction the progress in the implementation of the Johannesburg Summit decision to commence the full operationalization of PartNIR. We also welcome the adoption of the PartNIR Work Plan and the Terms of References of PartNIR Advisory Group. We will continue to take mutually beneficial initiatives in the six cooperation areas identified in the Work Plan, as agreed at the BRICS 2nd PartNIR meeting held in Brasilia in September 2019, including establishing BRICS industrial and science parks, innovation centers, technology business incubators and enterprises network. 

55. We take note of the progress made on the negotiation of the Agreement on Cooperation on BRICS Remote Sensing Satellite Constellation and look forward to its early conclusion. 

56. We acknowledge the crucial role of energy in promoting social and economic development, as well as environmental protection. While recognizing that the energy transition of each country is unique according to national circumstances, we underscore the importance of securing access to clean, sustainable, affordable energy to our populations. In this regard, diversification of energy sources is paramount to achieve energy security. To that end, we commit to continue to pursue the efficient use of fossil fuels and to increase the share of renewable energy in our economies, including biofuels, hydro, solar and wind. We welcome the ongoing cooperation among our countries in the field of energy. We welcome the holding the 4th Energy Ministerial Meeting in Brasilia and the adoption of the Terms of Reference for the BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform, which will further advance our mutual cooperation, allow for deeper exchange of views and best practices and significantly contribute to global research on energy. 

57. We welcome the 9th Meeting of BRICS Health Ministers and the Collaborative Research Program for TB, developed by BRICS TB Research Network in 2019, aimed at promoting new scientific, technological and innovative approaches to tackle the TB burden, by supporting scientific projects in a wide range of relevant issues related to TB. We also welcome the creation of the BRICS Network of Human Milk Banks as proposed in the 1st Workshop of Human Milk Banks. We emphasize the importance of our collective action in promoting research and development of medicines and diagnostic tools to end epidemics, to combat communicable diseases and to facilitate access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines, as well as activities to strengthen non-communicable diseases prevention. 

58. We welcome the outcomes of the BRICS Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meetings, in April and October, on the margins of IMF/WBG Meetings. We note with satisfaction the ongoing development of cooperation on financial issues. We stress the importance of enhancing BRICS financial cooperation to better serve the real economy and address the development needs of our populations. 

59. We note the progress achieved by the BRICS Customs Administrations regarding the draft BRICS Customs Mutual Administrative Assistance Agreement and direct our respective appropriate authorities to work towards its early conclusion and entry into force. We also welcome the substantial progress made in the implementation of the Strategic Framework of BRICS Customs Cooperation, especially with regard to the BRICS Authorized Economic Operator Program, which should be functional by the end of 2022, including the mutual recognition of controls and economic operators. We also acknowledge the positive practice of establishing BRICS Custom Training Centres and direct the pertinent authorities to continue this approach in the future. We recognize the potential of the BRICS Customs Cooperation Committee and call for enhanced intra-BRICS cooperation at relevant multilateral fora, including in trade facilitation, law enforcement, use of advanced information technologies and capacity building. 

60. We support efforts to increase trade and recognize that actions such as under-invoicing have a negative impact on trade and industrial policy and tax collection, and need to be addressed. 

61. We acknowledge the continued support provided by the BRICS Revenue Authorities towards the implementation of the global standards on transparency and exchange of information and the minimum standards against Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS). We remain committed to addressing the tax challenges of the digitalization of the economy. We look forward to further progress in the discussion of the two-pillar approach developed by the Inclusive Framework on BEPS. We welcome the recent achievement on tax transparency including the progress on automatic exchange of information for tax purposes. We call on all jurisdictions to sign and ratify the Multilateral Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters. We remain committed to enhancing our efforts on the prevention of base erosion and profit shifting, exchange of tax information, and needs-based capacity building for developing countries. We commit to deeper exchanges and sharing of experiences and best practices, as well as to mutual learning in taxation matters. 

62. We appreciate the positive results of the 9th BRICS Trade Ministers Meeting, supported by the work of the BRICS Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) and their efforts to further our cooperation on topics such as investment, e-commerce, micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) and intellectual property rights in cooperation with specialized BRICS IP Offices. We also welcome the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding among BRICS Trade and Investment Promotion Agencies (TIPAs)/Trade Promotion Organizations (TPOs).

63. We support the conclusion of the BRICS Trade Ministers that bold, coordinated international action is required to increase economic growth and sustainability. Increased trade can help with global growth, but the demand deficit in the global economy requires additional sources of growth, which could include infrastructure investment, including in digital infrastructure, skills development, particularly for young people, sustainable investment, investment in local basic services, and outward investment to areas of high potential growth, including on the African continent. 

64. We reaffirm our commitment to fight corruption, inter alia, through the strengthening of domestic legal frameworks, as appropriate, to more effectively address cases of corruption. We remain committed to adopting integrity measures in the public sector and promoting integrity standards in private enterprises and to build a stronger global commitment to a culture of intolerance towards corruption. We will maintain our ongoing efforts on anti-corruption law enforcement cooperation and returning of assets, including on civil and administrative proceedings. We will make full use of the BRICS Meeting on Asset Recovery and strengthen experience-sharing and case-cooperation on asset recovery among BRICS countries. We will enhance our exchange of views within multilateral frameworks such as UNCAC and the G20 Anti-Corruption Working Group, with the aim of joining efforts in denying safe haven to economic and corruption offenders and to facilitate the repatriation of proceeds of crime. 

65. We recognize the outcomes of the 5th BRICS Ministerial Meeting on Environment, held under the theme “Contribution of urban environmental management to improving the quality of life in cities”. We underline the importance of BRICS environmental cooperation initiatives that contribute to the quality of life in our cities, through the sharing of knowledge and experience on important issues such as waste management, circular economy, in the context of sustainable consumption and production, sanitation and water quality, urban air quality and urban green areas. We welcome the proposal of the Russian Federation on the new dimension of the Clean Rivers of BRICS Program on combining our efforts on combating marine litter. 

66. We welcome the outcomes of the 9th BRICS Agriculture Ministers Meeting. As world leading producers of agricultural goods and home to large populations, we underscore the importance of BRICS cooperation in agriculture. We recognize the importance of science-based agriculture and of deploying ICT to that end. We underline the need of ensuring food security, food safety, addressing malnutrition, eliminating hunger and poverty through increased agricultural production, productivity, sustainable management of natural resources and trade in agriculture among the BRICS countries. 

67. We welcome the outcomes of the 5th Labor and Employment Ministers’ Meeting on the theme “BRICS: economic growth for an innovative future”. We note the transformation in the labor market driven by globalization, technological innovation, demographic change and other phenomena, as well as the opportunities and challenges they bring. We note with satisfaction progress in BRICS cooperation with regard to the future of work, quality and productive employment for a sustainable system of social security, and labor market data exchanges. We underline that labor markets need to become more adaptable and inclusive. 

68. We acknowledge the role of cultural cooperation in enhancing understanding between peoples. We welcome the outcomes of the 4th Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Culture and their efforts to further strengthen cultural exchanges. We look forward to continued collaboration on cultural affairs, including the initiative on BRICS films and film productions. We commend the organization of the 4th BRICS Film Festival.

69. We reaffirm the importance of BRICS people-to-people exchanges in enhancing mutual understanding, friendship and cooperation among our peoples and express satisfaction at the holding of several meetings and activities in the fields of culture, governance, arts, sports, media, films, youth, and academic exchange. 

70. We welcome the exchanges in parliamentary cooperation among the BRICS countries, and take note with satisfaction of the meeting of the BRICS Parliamentary Forum held on the margins of the Inter Parliamentary Union Assembly in October. We recognize the importance of its contribution to strengthening BRICS partnerships. 

71. We also note the holding of the Seminar of high-level authorities and experts of the Judiciary, aimed at the exchange of good practices for the modernization and improvement of Judiciary systems in BRICS countries. 

72. Russia, India, China and South Africa commend Brazil´s BRICS Chairship in 2019 and express their gratitude to the government and people of Brazil for hosting the 11th BRICS Summit in Brasília. 

73. Brazil, India, China and South Africa extend full support to Russia for its BRICS Chairmanship in 2020 and the hosting of the 12th BRICS Summit in Saint Petersburg.

Annexes  

Annex 1: BRICS Cooperation Outcomes 

The following outcomes, initiatives or documents have been adopted or signed:

1.Joint Media Statement of the BRICS Informal leaders’ meeting on the margins of the G20 Summit

2.Media statement of the Stand-Alone Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs / International Relations 

3.Media statement of the Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations (on the margins of the 74th UNGA)

4.Joint Communiqué of the BRICS Health Ministers Meeting in Geneva

5.Declaration of the 5th BRICS Communications Ministers Meeting

6.Joint Statement for the 5th BRICS Ministers of Environment Meeting

7.BRICS Ministers of Environment’s Decision on Cooperation

8.Joint statement of the Labor and Employment Ministers Meeting (LEMM) 

9.Campinas Declaration - Joint statement of the 7th Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Science, Technology and Innovation 

10.Enabling Framework for the Innovation BRICS Network (iBRICS)

11.Document on a New STI Architecture of BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI)

12.BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Calendar of Activities 2019-2020

13.BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Work Plan 2019-2022

14.Bonito Declaration - Joint statement of the BRICS Agriculture Ministers Meeting 

15.Joint statement of the 4th BRICS Ministers of Culture Meeting 

16.Joint statement of the 9th BRICS Health Ministers Meeting

17.Joint statement of the Meeting of BRICS Trade Ministers 

18.Joint statement of the 4th Meeting of BRICS Energy Ministers 

19.Joint statement from the Deputy Ministers and Special Envoys on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA)

20.Terms of Reference of the BRICS Energy Research Cooperation Platform

21.Memorandum of Understanding among BRICS Trade and Investment Promotion Agencies (TIPAs)

22.Memorandum of Understanding on Private Investment Mobilization among BRICS Development Banks 

23.Declaration of the 1st BRICS Meeting on Human Milk Banks

24.1st BRICS Meeting on Asset Recovery of the BRICS Anti-Corruption WG 

25.Terms of Reference of the Advisory Group for the BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR)

26.Work Plan of the BRICS Partnership on New Industrial Revolution (PartNIR)

27.Seminar “BRICS Strategies for Countering-Terrorism” 

28.Creation of BRICS Counter-Terrorism Sub-Working Groups

29.Creation of the BRICS Network of Human Milk Banks 

30.Collaborative Research Program for TB

Annex 2: Meetings held under the Brazilian Chairship 

The following meetings were held under Brazil’s BRICS Chairship: 

Leaders Meetings:

1.Informal Meeting of the BRICS Leaders (on the margins of the G20 Summit) – 28 June 2019 (Osaka)

2.11th BRICS Summit – 13-14 November 2019 (Brasília)

Ministerial Meetings:

1.4th Annual Meeting of the NDB Board of Governors – 1-2 April 2019 (Cape Town)

2.BRICS Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors Meeting (on the margins of IMF Spring Meeting) – 11 April 2019 (Washington, DC)

3.BRICS Health Ministerial Dinner (on the margins of the 72nd World Health Assembly) – 20 May 2019 (Geneva)

4.3rd Stand-Alone Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations – 26 July 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

5.Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Communication – 14 August 2019 (Brasília)

6.BRICS Ministers of Environment Meeting – 15 August 2019 (São Paulo)

7.Labor and Employment Ministers Meeting (LEMM) – 19-20 September 2019 (Brasília)

8.7th Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Science, Technology and Innovation – 20 September 2019 (Campinas)

9.BRICS Agriculture Ministers Meeting – 25-26 September 2019 (Bonito)

10.Meeting of the BRICS Ministers of Foreign Affairs/International Relations (on the margins of the 74th UNGA) – 26 September 2019 (New York)

11.4th BRICS Ministers of Culture Meeting – 11 October 2019 (Curitiba)

12.Meeting of Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors – FMCBG – 17 October 2019 (Washington, DC)

13.National Security Advisors Meeting – 17-18 October 2019 (Brasília)

14.9th BRICS Health Ministers Meeting – 25 October 2019 (Curitiba)

15.Meeting of BRICS Trade Ministers – 11 November 2019 (Brasília)

16.4th Meeting of BRICS Energy Ministers – 11 November 2019 (Brasília)

Senior Officials and Sectoral Meetings: 

1.BRICS Deputy Finance Ministers and Deputy Central Bank Governors Meeting – 16 January 2019 (Tokyo)

2.1st Meeting of BRICS Anti-Corruption Working Group (ACWG) – 21 January 2019 (Tokyo)

3.Meeting of BRICS Task Force on PPPs and Infrastructure – 31 January 2019 (Singapore)

4.4th BRICS TB Research Meeting – 19-21 February 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

5.1st Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 13-15 March 2019 (Curitiba)

6.Meeting of BRICS Task Force of PPPs and Infrastructure - 19 March 2019 (Melbourne) 

7.BRICS National Statistical Office Technical Meeting – 20-21 March 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

8.BRICS Employment Working Group (BEWG) Informal Meeting (on the margins of ILO's Governing Body Meeting) – 25 March 2019 (Geneva)

9.BRICS Coordination Meeting on the margins of the Commission of Population and Development – 4 April 2019 (New York)

10.BRICS Bound Fund - BBF - Cooperative Committee – 11 April 2019 (Washington, DC)

11.Meeting of BRICS Heads of Intellectual Property Offices (HIPO BRICS) – 14-16 April 2019 (Cape Town)

12.Annual International Conference on “Digital Transformation: Focus on IP” – 23-24 April 2019 (Moscow)

13.Meeting of BRICS Task Force of PPPs and Infrastructure - 25 April 2019 (Moscow) 

14.Third Meeting of BRICS Science Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship Partnership (STIEP) Working Group – 13-14 May, 2019 (Foz do Iguaçu)

15.3rd Meeting of BRICS Working Group on High Performance Computing and Information Technology – 13-14 May, 2019 (Foz do Iguaçu)

16.BRICS Meeting on Asset Recovery (on the margins of UNCAC WG Meeting on Asset Recovery) – 28 May 2019 (Vienna)

17.20th Meeting of the Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 29-30 May 2019 (Brasília)

18.Technical Meeting on the margins of UNESCO's 7th session of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on the Protection and Promotion

of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions – 5 June 2019 (Paris)

19.BRICS Deputy Finance Ministers and Deputy Central Bank Governors Meeting - on the margins of the G20 Meeting – 8 June 2019 (Fukuoka)

20.BRICS Senior Officials Meeting on the Energy Research Cooperation Platform – 17-18 June 2019 (Moscow)

21.BRICS Employment Working Group (BEWG) Informal Meeting (on the margins of ILO's ILC) – 25 June 2019 (Geneva)

22.2nd Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas (on the margins of the G20 Summit) – 26-27 June 2019 (Osaka)

23.5th BRICS TB Network meeting – 2-3 July 2019 (Beijing)

24.Meeting of the BRICS Deputy Ministers (Special Envoys) on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) – 4-5 July 2019 (Brasília)

25.6th Meeting of BRICS Solid State Lighting Collaboration Working Group – 8-11 July 2019 (Beijing)

26.Meeting of BRICS Customs Specialists – 16-19 July 2019 (Curitiba)

27.BRICS Deputy Agriculture Ministers Meeting – 17-18 July 2019 (Brasília)

28.BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism - ICM - Technical Group Meeting and Working Group Meetings – 22-25 July 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

29.3rd Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 22-25 July 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

30.Seminar “BRICS Strategies for Countering-Terrorism” – 29-31 July 2019 (Brasília)

31.2nd BRICS Working Groups on Studying Competition on Digital Markets (on the margin of the International Conference "Designing Anti-Trust for the Digital Era") – 31 July and 1 August 2019 (Brasília)

32.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Counter-Terrorism – 1-2 August 2019 (Brasília)

33.3rd Meeting of the Working Group on Oceanic and Polar Science and Technology – 1-2 August 2019 (Moscow)

34.Working Group on Environment – 12-13 August 2019 (Brasília)

35.Meeting of the Council of the BRICS Institute for Future Networks – 12 August 2019 (Brasília)

36.Meeting of BRICS Working Group on Information Technology and Communications (ICTs) – 13 August 2019 (Brasília)

37.Working Group Meeting on Security in the use of Information Technology and Communications (ICTs) – 21-22 August 2019 (Brasília)

38.BRICS Workshop on Human Milk Bank (complementary action of the World Breastfeeding Week - August 1-7, 2019) – 26-30 August 2019 (Brasília)

39.21st Meeting of the Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 29-30 August 2019 (Brasília)

40.Video conference on Culture – follow-up on the meeting of 5 June 2019 – 29 August 2019

41.5th BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Funding Working Group Meeting – 16-17 September 2019 (Campinas)

42.2nd meeting of the PartNIR Advisory Group – 16-17 September 2019 (Brasília)

43.5th BRICS Employment Working Group (BEWG5) Meeting – 16-18 September 2019 (Brasília)

44.VI BRICS Competition Conference – 16-19 September 2019 (Moscow)

45.BRICS Network of Labor Research Institutes – 17-18 September 2019 (Brasília)

46.9th BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Senior Officials Meeting – 19 September 2019 (Campinas)

47.4th Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas (on the margins of the 74th UNGA) – 23-24 September 2019 (New York)

48.5th BRICS Astronomy Working Group Meeting – 29 September-2 October 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

49.Meeting of BRICS Heads of Intellectual Property Offices (HIPO BRICS) – 1 October 2019 (Geneva)

50.6th BRICS Culture Senior Officials Meeting – 10 October 2019 (Curitiba)

51.BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement (CRA) Standing Committee –17 October 2019 (Washington – DC) 

52.BRICS Contingent Reserve Arrangement  (CRA) Government Council – 17 October 2019 (Washington – DC)

53.BRICS Forum on  Smart Manufacturing and PartNIR – 18-19 October 2019 (Nanjing)

54.22nd Meeting of the Contact Group on Economic and Trade Issues (CGETI) – 22-23 October 2019 (Brasília)

55.5th Meeting of BRICS Regulatory Agencies of Health Products – 23 October 2019 (Brasília)

56.BRICS Senior Health Officials’ Meeting – 23-24 October 2019 (Curitiba)

57.Informal Meeting of BRICS Legal Advisers – 31 October 2019 (New York)

58.BRICS TB Research Network non-official Meeting (on the margins of the 50th Union Conference on Lung Health) – 30 October-2 November

2019 (Hyderabad)

59.6th BRICS TB Research Network Meeting – 4-5 November 2019 (New Delhi)

60.4th BRICS Young Scientists Forum – 6-8 November 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

61.BRICS Senior Energy Officials’ Meeting – 8 November 2019 (Brasília)

62.5th Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas (prior to the 11th BRICS Summit) – 9-12 November 2019 (Brasília)

63.5th BRICS Heads of Export Credit Agencies (ECA) Meeting – 10-11 November 2019 (Brasília)

64.Meeting of CEOs of BRICS Interbank Cooperation Mechanism (ICM) – 11 November 2019 (Rio de Janeiro) 

65.Meeting of BRICS Experts and Customs Administrators – 11-14 November 2019 (Brasília)

66.Seminar on the New Development Bank (NDB) – 13 November 2019 (Brasília)

People-to-people, business, judicial and legislative meetings:

1.BRICS Military Pentathlon Tournament – 19-22 March, 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

2.Midterm Meeting of BRICS Business Council – 3-4 April 2019 (Johannesburg);

3.3rd International BRICS Countries Drama Schools Festival – 29 May-7 June 2019 (Moscow)

4.3rd International Festival "Student Spring of the BRICS and SCO Countries" – 4-9 June 2019 (Stavropol)

5.Communication Business to Business Meeting (B2B) – 13 August 2019 (Brasília)

6.Meeting of the BRICS Think-Tank Council (BTTC) – 10 September 2019 (Brasília)

7.BRICS Academic Forum – 11-12 September 2019 (Brasília)

8.VIII BRICS Union Forum – 17-18 September 2019 (Brasília)

9.14th Curitiba International Biennial of Contemporary Art – 21 September 2019-23 February 2020 (Curitiba)

10.4th Edition of the BRICS Film Festival – 23 September-9 October 2019 (Niterói)

11.Business Forum of the 4th Edition of the BRICS Film Festival – 30 September-1 October 2019 (Niterói)

12.2nd BRICS Youth Energy Agency Summit – 5 October 2019 (Moscow)

13.3rd BRICSMATH.COM Online Mathematics Competition for Primary School Students – 12 October-13 December 2019

14.5th Cultural Research Expedition “Great Teachers of BRICS” – 12-19 October 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

15.6th BRICS Legal Forum – 14-16 October 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

16.BRICS Parliamentary Forum – 16 October 2019 (Belgrade)

17.5th Youth Summit – 17-20 October 2019 (Brasília)

18.Seminar of high-level authorities and experts of the Judiciary – 24-25 October 2019 (Brasília)

19.3rd BRICS Seminar on Governance- 28 October 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

20.3rd BRICS Conference at the University of São Paulo – 28-30 October 2019 (São Paulo)

21.4th Edition of the BRICS Media Forum – 30-31 October 2019 (São Paulo)

22.2nd BRICS Science Academies Meeting – 4-5 November 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

23.Seminar “10 years of BRICS: a balance and a future” – 6-8 November 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

24.Welcome Event of the BRICS Parliamentary Front of the Brazilian National Congress – 12 November 2019 (Brasilia)

25.BRICS Financial Forum – 12 November 2019 (Rio de Janeiro)

26.Meetings of the 9 Working Groups of the BRICS Business Council – 12 November 2019 (Brasília)

27.Annual Meeting of the BRICS Business Council – 13 November 2019 (Brasília)

28.BRICS Business Forum – 13 November 2019 (Brasília)

29.BRICS Future Skills Conference – 14 November 2019 (Brasília)

Activities for the remainder of Brazil’s BRICS Chairship 2019

Senior Officials and Sectoral Meetings: 

1.3rd BRICS STI Working Group Meeting on Biotechnology and Biomedicine including Human Health and Neuroscience – 26-27 November 2019 (Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory, Campinas)

2.2nd Meeting of the BRICS Working Group on Research Infrastructure and Mega-science Projects – 4-6 December 2019 (Shanghai)

3.6th Meeting of BRICS Sherpas/Sous-Sherpas – 12-13 December 2019 (Brasília)

In total, 116 meetings will have been held under Brazil´s BRICS Chairship.